About the SCE

The Society of Christian Ethics has a current membership of some 900 men and women drawn primarily from among ethics professors in universities, colleges and seminaries, but also including persons whose work involves social policy analysis and/or social policy responsibilities in other settings. Please visit the pages below for more information regarding the SCE.

Who we are

The purpose of the Society is to promote scholarly work in Christian ethics and in the relation of Christian ethics to other traditions of ethics, and to social, economic, political and cultural problems; to encourage and improve the teaching of these fields in colleges, universities and theological schools; and to provide a community of discourse and debate for those engaged professionally within these general fields.

A non-denominational scholarly association founded in 1959, the Society of Christian Ethics draws its approximately 900 members from the faculties of universities, colleges, and theological schools primarily in the United States, Canada, and Europe. The vitality of the Society of Christian Ethics reflects the maturing academic discipline of Christian ethics.

The SCE promotes research in: the history of ethics and moral theology; theoretical issues relating to the interplay of theology and ethics; methodology in ethical reflection and investigation; and comparative religious ethics. At the same time, the Society addresses, in national and global contexts, problems in applied and professional ethics, and various human-rights and social-justice issues.

History of the SCE

History and Practice

(reprinted from the CSSR Bulletin 32:2 [2003], with the kind permission of the CSSR)

Edward Leroy Long, Jr., James W. Pearsall Professor Emeritus of Christian Ethics and Theology of Culture, Drew University, Madison, NJ
Christine Gudorf, Department of Religious Studies, Florida International University, Miami, FL

The Society of Christian Ethics has a current membership of some 1024 men and women drawn primarily from among ethics professors in universities, colleges and seminaries, but also including persons whose work involves social policy analysis and/or social policy responsibilities in other settings. Membership requirements emphasize academic credentials (usually requiring the doctorate) but do not set any conditions regarding a faith commitment or an ecclesiastical/religious identity. Student membership can now be held for up to ten years by anyone matriculated into a doctoral program in ethics (before 2002 only by those ABD, up to a limit of five years).

Although formally 44 years old in 2003, the Society grew out of meetings of Protestant seminary professors of ethics who met together several times without a formal charter in the 1950s as an Association of Seminary Professors of Christian Social Ethics. Those early meetings were attended by a small group of one to two dozen persons (estimated to be about a fifth of the persons in the field at the time), and were held in academic settings, including Yale Divinity School, Union Theological Seminary in New York, the College of Preachers in Washington, Oberlin Graduate School of Theology, Western Theological Seminary in Pittsburgh, and Eastern Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. The Edward W. Hazen Foundation provided a grant of approximately $350 each year to subsidize attendees’ travel and housing expenses.

The Society has not had the same name throughout the 44 years. Through special efforts made by Professor Das Kelley Barnett (its most energetic sponsor) to obtain a larger participation in the life of the association by seminary professors, a larger more structured organization was created at a meeting at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington in January 1959. That group adopted the new name The American Society of Christian Social Ethics. Five years later the adjective Social was dropped amid some debate, following the argument that all ethics is social in nature The adjective American was dropped in l980 because it was recognized that a significant number of the Society’s members were Canadian. Since 1980 the name, Society of Christian Ethics, has remained unchanged despite several unsuccessful efforts to change the name to The Society of Religious Ethics. Those efforts have never been successful despite the fact that nothing in the program planning of the Society has ever required a specifically Christian commitment as a condition for inclusion and there has been some significant attention to ethical thinking in other religious traditions. The Society is incorporated in the state of Tennessee; its bylaws require an annual assessment by external auditors in accordance with Tennessee law.

Membership

The membership of the Society has changed over the years not only in size but also in composition, especially its gender and denominational composition. At the very start the membership was almost completely male and was drawn largely from those teaching in seminaries, including many clergy. The 1960 membership roster listed 116 males and 1 female; by 1964 there were 140 members, including 2 females; at the twenty-fifth anniversary in 1983 there were 664 members, about 50 female. Today the membership is approximately 35% female. In the first years the membership was predominately white. There were six African-American members in 1960 and fifteen by 1983, but the proportion of African-American members has not kept pace with the growth of the Society, and remains under 50.

One of the most significant developments has been the shift from the early almost completely Protestant composition of the Society to one that now includes a large number of Roman Catholics (both priests and lay theologians), several Orthodox Christians, and a small number of Jewish scholars. After Vatican II, a few Roman Catholic moral theologians began to attend the meetings and the number of Roman Catholics who became members grew steadily from 1963 on, until Catholics are by far the largest single denomination in the SCE.

Not only have Catholics, Orthodox, and Jewish persons become members, but individuals from all of these groups have become officers of the Society. As an example of the Catholic influx, in 2003 the President, Vice-president (president-elect)) the Executive Director, half the Board of Directors, and both the Co-editors of the Journal of the SCE were Catholic. By the twenty-fifth anniversary in 1983, the greatest number of members were teaching in colleges or universities rather than seminaries, and this proportion has continued to gradually rise since then as public universities developed departments of Religious Studies.

During the first twenty-five years of the Society’s existence nearly forty-five percent of the members were located in the East (New England, Middle and South Atlantic states) and about 12% were located in the West (Mountain and Pacific Coast States). Between the twenty-fifth anniversary (1983) and the year 2001 the percentage of members living in New England, the Midwest, and Pacific coast states has undergone very little change, but the middle Atlantic States in contrast have lost almost 5 percentage points, while the south Atlantic and western plains and mountain states have gained slightly. The Canadian membership has remained almost the same numerically (about thirty), but lost ground percentage-wise. The biggest gain has been a three fold increase in overseas members which now numbers around three dozen.

Governance

The governance of the Society evolved slowly at first but has subsequently changed very little. By-laws were drafted starting in l961 and adopted in l964. These provide for the following elected officials: a president and a vice-president who serve for one year; twelve directors, three elected each year to serve a term of four years; and an executive secretary (since 1994 called the Executive Director) who serves four years. Later the position of archivist was added and was held for many years by the same person. During the early years nominations for these positions were drawn up at the annual meeting by a committee which met on location and submitted a list which contained no alternative choices. Nominations from the floor were allowable, but were seldom made. As the Society became larger and more diverse, elections changed. Beginning in 1975 multiple choices were offered for membership on the Board of Directors and since 1977 at least two names were submitted for the vice-presidential office–the presumptive president the following year. Currently, the nominations committee is selected a year in advance and submits its report to the membership months before the annual meeting.

The Society now holds one three day national meeting each year in early January. The current program consists of two to three plenary sessions (often with presentations by invited experts from outside the Society’s membership), seven concurrent sessions on topics submitted for consideration by members, a presidential address, the meeting of several ongoing interest groups, and a popular “Breakfast with an Author” for the discussion of 20-25 recently published books by members. An annual business meeting is held for the election of officers, for the approval of a budget, and for possible changes to by-laws and the Constitution. One sectional branch, on the West Coast, holds a shorter meeting each year.

Annual Meetings

While the Society has always met in January, the date has shifted from late January to an earlier week-end, now carefully chosen to avoid Martin Luther King’s birthday. The length of the meeting has grown longer over the years and the program larger and more complex. The first several meetings consisted of three of four plenary sessions and one overnight. The last few years the length of the meeting has expanded to a full two and a half days with auxiliary meetings both before and after the formal program. The total number of participants, both presenters and conveners, on the program has also increased. In the early years the number was in the teens; a decade later, in the thirties; by the mid l970's in the sixties. The highest number of participants in the first twenty five years was 111. The 2003 meeting had over two hundred participants listed in the program. The Society now must hold its meetings in large commercial conference facilities rather than on campuses. Attendance is now around 500 and has gone as high as 550 in 2001.

The substantive content of the annual programs across the years has been rich and varied, so much so that it is difficult to overview it simply. The themes of several books that became classics after publication were first shared with the Society as papers. Probably the greatest number of papers have dealt with foundational issues–that is, consideration of the biblical, historical, philosophical, theological and social-scientific grounding of the discipline.

Another group of papers has sought to understand oppression and to suggest ways to overcome it. These papers have dealt with 1) African-American liberation and racism; 2) feminism and the oppression of women; 3) gay and lesbian matters, and the situation of native Americans, both in the States and in Canada.

Issues of war and peace have appeared prominently on the program, although the delineation of the issues has changed over the years. Nuclear weaponry, deterrence theory, just war teaching, the relevance of the pacifist witness, the legitimacy of intervention, and the problem of violence in general have all been discussed both as abstract theory and as current policy issues. Such discussions have occurred from the very first years; the 2003 program featured one plenary and five concurrent sessions on the use of violence.

Many members of the Society have been interested in the nature and function of law, an interest that extends into and relates to the study of political action and the protection of human rights. An equally important focus of attention has been economics, including globalization, technology, and the care of the environment. Biomedical ethics has been prominent on the program, engaging both professors and members employed in the healthcare sector.    

Sessions on the programs have provided for dialogue between Protestants and Roman Catholics, between those in Western and Eastern branches of Christianity, and between Christians and Jews. Some attention, modest but increasing in amount and importance over the years, has been devoted to understanding ethical thinking in other religions of the world. A scattering of papers has dealt with the relation between ethics and liturgy, and of ethics with higher education. Sexuality has been a recurring topic and attention to it has increased, mirroring its prominence in ecclesial and social discussions.

Publishing

Early in its history the Society took actions to develop its own publishing agenda, first ambitiously conceived as a journal of high scholarly quality to be published on a regular schedule. But it took a long time to bring the ideal to fruition. Several committees were formed during the 1960s to consider the possibilities of producing some Society publication, and the first effort was a Newsletter. Subsequent publications included bibliographical essays on specific topics, the first of which was on Black studies. This appeared almost a decade following initial discussion of publication possibilities. Meanwhile, Charles Reynolds, with support from the University of Tennessee, undertook to publish a Journal of Religious Ethics and asked the Society to provide active encouragement for the venture. The editors and editorial board were almost all members of the Society, but the Journal did not at that time become the SCE’s official organ. Meanwhile several additional bibliographical essays were prepared and distributed..

By 1975 the Society ceased distributing mimeographed minutes and selected papers from the annual meeting and produced a printed volume entitled The Selected Papers. By 1981 this publication was renamed The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics, and an editor was appointed by the Board to serve for a three year (later five year) term. Meanwhile, the Society provided a small grant to help the launching of The Journal of Law and Religion, the relationship of which to the Society was analogous to the friendly but unofficial relation enjoyed at that time by The Journal of Religious Ethics.

The Annual from its inception was not a proceedings, but a double refereed selection from the papers delivered at the annual meeting. As the number of papers delivered at annual meeting increased over the years, so did the number of pages in The Annual, which selected roughly one third of the meeting papers for publication. In 1996 the Editorship of The Annual became a Co-editorship, and at the end of that five year term, another Co-editorship began. By 2001, the size of The Annual was fast approaching 500 pages. With the support of the Report of the 21st Century Committee in 2002 The Annual became the Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics; in 2003 the JSCE began publishing two issues a year, shifted from camera-ready to type-set publishing, and made plans for a book review section in 2004.

As the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Society approached in 1983 Edward LeRoy Long, Jr. was asked to write a history of the Society. This was prepared in camera ready form on a then quite primitive computer available at that time and published in 1984 with help from the Journal of Religious Ethics but under the imprint of Religious Ethics, Inc. It bore the title Academic Bonding and Social Concern. That volume, now out of print, provides very detailed elaboration of the story given in such condensed form in this account.

Affiliations

At the end of its first decade the SCE explored the possibility of becoming a member of the American Council of Learned Societies. It was discouraged from going forward with a formal application by the then president of the ACLS on the ground that the range of the Society’s interest was too narrow and its identity too young. At the time the Society suspected that behind that response may well have been the common suspicion of religion as a scholarly field that has been a general problem in higher education. Nevertheless, there was a potential problem in granting ACLS membership to but one of the plethora of professional groups concerned with aspects of religious studies. Moreover, the American Academy of Religion was emerging at the time as the presumptive parent group for all aspects of religious studies and hence would have been a more natural choice for ACLS.

That rebuff did not deter the SCE from working with other learned societies in subsequent years. It became very active early in the creation of the Council for the Study of Religion and several of its delegates to that body have been elected to key offices. The SCE had a role in the International Congress of Learned Societies in the Field of Religion that was held in Los Angeles in September of l972 but declined to move its annual meeting that year to coincide with that of the Congress. Over the years many members of the SCE have participated in the ethics section of the American Academy of Religion, but there has never been a formal working agreement between the two groups. Similar informal interchange has occurred over the years between the SCE and the Society for Values in Higher Education, particularly when the latter was called The Society for Religion in Higher Education.

Public Witness

The primary purpose of the Society has always been to support and encourage academic achievement but from time to time its members have become so concerned about a public issue as to consider taking a stand. This has often prompted a discussion about the appropriateness of doing so, but when a glaring social problem arises the reservations are often shelved (not necessarily with everyone’s approval). A member of the Society was pivotal in getting the session which the SCE sponsored at the Congress of Religion (Los Angeles, 1971) to pass a resolution criticizing the American bombing of North Vietnam. The Board sent greetings in 1971 to the American Civil Liberties Union on its fiftieth anniversary. In 1971, when the trial of Father Berrigan and others took place the Society created a task force to consider the threat to academic freedom and civil liberties. The task force polled the membership for ideas and reactions and eventually a paper was written which was printed by the Department of Church and Society of the Presbyterian Church with the title U.S. vs. the Harrisburg 8: Conspiracy Persecution for Illegal Dissent. The Society made its voice heard in urging the nation’s bicentennial celebration to avoid becoming a self-congratulatory binge. It passed a resolution supporting the move to make Martin Luther King’s birthday a national holiday. It publicly supported both academic freedom and its past president, Charles Curran, in his dismissal from The Catholic University of America, expressed deep concern over the Vatican’s treatment of Hans Küng, and expressed opposition to a surge of militant racism. More recently it opposed the 1991 Gulf War and defended needle exchange programs to prevent the spread of AIDS.

When the 4-H Center in Washington, which had been the SCE’s single most frequent meeting site, closed its doors to a group open to gay and lesbians as well as to Amnesty International, the Board decided not to meet there again unless the Center revised its policy. Perhaps one of the most thoroughly considered and important actions of the Society with regard to the conduct of its own life was to draft a policy concerning sexual conduct which provided sanctions against members engaging in any misconduct while participating in the Society’s life, a policy later incorporated into a broader policy covering all aspects of professional conduct.

21st Century Committee

As the 20th century drew to a close, the Society appointed a committee, the 21st Century Committee, to conduct a self study as it looked to the future. That study, which involved an extensive survey of the membership, reaffirmed the basic identity and practice of the Society at the same time that it clarified a number of shifts that had taken place within that identity and pointed to some necessary adaptations to changed conditions in the Society and the larger community. The 21st Century Committee Report recommended a number of changes which have already been implemented, including a Society website (www.scethics.org) listing annual meetings, programs, Presidential Address, a searchable but not downloadable directory of members, email and listserv information, and subscription information for the JSCE. Recognizing the increased size of the Society, a half-day extension of the annual meeting was recommended and implemented, as was a suggested writer’s group. The most ambitious proposal was the establishment and funding of four Working Groups with four year mandates to cultivate conversations and working relationships focused on Hispanic Christian Ethics, African and African-American Christian Ethics, Jewish and Christian Ethics and Islamic and Christian Ethics. Partly as a result of this proposal the newly formed Society of Jewish Ethics met in conjunction with the SCE in 2003, with its program co-ordinated with that of the SCE and printed in the SCE program.

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Official Documents

Please click the links below to read official documents of the SCE. You may download a PDF of the complete document as well.

By-Laws

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SCE By-Laws76.03 KB

Articles from the SCE By-Laws, based on the document as amended at the 2006 Society of Christian Ethics annual meeting. You may download the full document by clicking the PDF link below.

Articles I-II: Name and Purpose

ARTICLE I

Name

The name of this organization shall be The Society of Christian Ethics.

ARTICLE II

Purpose

The purpose of the Society shall be to promote scholarly work in the field of Christian ethics and in the relation of Christian ethics to other traditions of ethics and to social, economic, political, and cultural problems; to encourage and improve the teaching of these fields in colleges, universities and theological schools; and to provide a community of discourse and debate for those engaged professionally within these general fields.

Article III: Membership

ARTICLE III

Membership

Section l. Eligibility

Persons eligible for membership shall include (1) college, university, or seminary teachers of Christian ethics or social ethics; (2) persons teaching in similar institutions in other fields who are concerned with the relation of Christian ethics to their subject matter; and (3) persons whose full-time professional work in church, government, social agency or elsewhere is related to the purposes of the Society. A prerequisite for membership is at least one of the following: a Ph.D. or equivalent degree, scholarly publications in the above-named fields, or a full-time teaching position in ethics and/or related fields in an accredited institution of higher education.

Doctoral students in ethics or related fields may become members of the Society upon matriculation into a doctoral program. This status ordinarily may be retained for not more than ten years.

Section 2. Election to Membership

Membership in the Society shall be granted by a majority vote of the Board of Directors. Applications for membership shall be made in writing to the Executive Director, who shall present the same to the Board of Directors for its action.

Section 3. Conduct of Members in the Internal Scholarly and Organizational Activities of the Society

The Society will conduct all its business in a manner appropriate to its purposes (see Article II), and expects members to conduct themselves within the Society in a manner appropriate to the purposes of the Society. Achievement of those purposes--the formation of a community of discourse, debate, and research which engages in scholarly work in and teaching of Christian ethics in relation to social, economic, political, and cultural problems--requires members to respect both the basic human dignity of all persons and the recognized social and political rights of individuals which proceed from that dignity. Society members, agents, or employees acting within the Society will therefore refrain from any form of harassment or unjust discrimination, in deed or word, based in race, sex, age, nationality, ethnicity, religious community, sexual orientation, or physical condition. Respect for the work and property of others will exclude plagiarism, copyright infringement, and unacknowledged use of the research of others.

Nothing in this Article shall be interpreted to prohibit members of the Society from articulating the positions of their respective belief systems, religious traditions or ecclesial communions, nor shall this Article be interpreted to prohibit open and vigorous discussion of controversial issues by members of the Society, both within its meetings and elsewhere.

Section 4. Life Membership

Upon recommendation by the Executive Director, Life Membership without payment of dues will be granted by the Board of Directors to those who have retired and who have been members in good standing of the Society for at least 25 years. In exceptional circumstances, on recommendation of the Executive Director, a member having retired, but having less than 25 years of membership in good standing in the Society, may be granted life membership by a majority vote of the Board of Directors.

Section 5. Maintenance of Membership

Membership in the Society shall be maintained by payment of the annual dues. Membership shall be terminated by resignation or by failure to pay annual dues. Reinstatement of membership will automatically accompany the payment of annual dues.

Section 6. Dues

The Board of Directors shall set membership dues, which shall run for the calendar year.

Section 7. Termination of Membership for Cause

Membership in the Society may be terminated, suspended, or restricted for cause by vote of two-thirds (2/3) of the members of the Board of Directors. The Board shall provide the members in question with no less than fifteen (15) days’ prior written notice of the proposed expulsion, suspension, termination, or restriction and the reasons therefore. The Board shall also provide an opportunity ofr the members to be heard by the Board, orally or in writing, not less than five (5) days before the effective date of the expulsion, suspension, termination, or restriction. It shall be the responsibility of the President of the Society, working together with the Executive Director, to formulate and implement further details of a procedure that are fair and reasonable given the circumstances of the case, including but not limited to its timing relative to the regularly scheduled meetings of the Board, and the geographic proximity of the member in question and the members of the Board. Nothing in this provision shall be construed to limit the right of the Society to terminate, suspend, or restrict membership for non-payment of dues.

Articles IV-V: Meetings and Officers

ARTICLE IV

Meetings

The Society shall hold an Annual Meeting at a time and place to be determined by the Board of Directors or its Executive Committee, for the reading and discussing of scholarly papers, election of officers, and the conduct of the Society's official business. A quorum for conducting business at the Annual Meeting shall consist of a number of members equal to ten percent (10%) of the membership in the Society at the time of the Annual Meeting.

ARTICLE V

Officers

The Officers of the Society are the President, the Vice President, The Executive Director, and the Treasurer.

Section 1. President

The President shall serve for a term of one year commencing with the adjournment of the Annual Meeting, and shall be selected in accordance with the procedure described in Article V, Section 2. The President shall preside at the Annual Meeting and at the meetings of the Board of Directors, and shall receive, together with the Board, reports from the Executive Director and shall have and exercise such other powers and duties as may be prescribed by the Board. The President shall customarily deliver a "Presidential Address" to the membership at the Annual Meeting.

Section 2. Vice President

The Vice President shall serve for a term of one year commencing with the adjournment of the Annual Meeting. The Vice President shall be elected by a majority vote of members present and voting at the Annual Meeting of the Society. The Vice President shall be President-Designate, and shall automatically succeed to the office of President after the completion of a one-year term. In the event of the resignation, death, or incapacity of the President, the Vice President shall serve as acting President of the Society, and shall perform such presidential duties as the Board of Directors deems appropriate. In the event of the resignation, death, or incapacity of the Vice President, the Board of Directors, in consultation with the Nominating Committee, shall arrange for a replacement in a timely fashion.

Section 3. Executive Director/Secretary

The Executive Director shall be appointed by the Board of Directors. The Executive Director shall serve as Secretary of the Society. The Executive Director shall have responsibility for preparing the minutes of the meetings of the Board of Directors and of the Members. He or she shall give or cause to be given notices of all such meetings, shall authenticate records of the Society, and shall see that records and reports are properly kept and filed by the Society. The Executive Director, with the assistance of the Treasurer, shall prepare or oversee the preparation of all reports and filings required by the State of Tennessee, the Internal Revenue Service, and other government agencies.

The Executive Director, in consultation and cooperation with the Board of Directors, the Executive Committee, and the Program Committee, shall coordinate the planning and execution of the Annual Meeting and all activities associated with it, including but not limited to the selection and of meeting sites, the production of the Annual Meeting Program, and the provision of materials and facilities needed at the Annual Meeting. The Executive Director shall have the authority to execute on behalf of the Society any contracts and other legal documents that he or she reasonably deems necessary to further the successful occurrence of the Annual Meeting and any other regular or special meetings of the Society or its Committees. The Executive Director shall serve ex officio as a member of the Executive Committee. The Executive Director shall have other such duties and powers as designated by the Board of Directors.

Section 4. Treasurer.

The Treasurer shall be appointed by the Board of Directors. The Treasurer shall be in charge of the Society’s financial affairs, books of account, accounting records or procedures, funds, securities and valuable papers, and shall keep full and accurate records thereof. The Treasurer shall render to the Executive Director and to the Board of Directors at their request an account of all transactions by the treasurer and of the financial condition of the Society. The treasurer shall assist the Executive Director in preparation of all reports and filings required by the State of Tennessee, the Internal Revenue Service, and other government agencies. The treasurer shall have such other duties and powers as designated by the Board of Directors.

Articles VI-VIII: Board of Directors, Archivist, and Committees

ARTICLE VI

Board of Directors

The Board of Directors shall consist of the following members: the President, the Vice President, the immediate Past-President, the Executive Director, the Editor or Co-editors of the Journal, twelve (12) other members elected by majority vote of the members present and voting at the Annual Meeting in classes of three for terms of four years. A Director elected at the Annual Meeting may be elected to another term, but only after an interval of at least one year. The Board of Directors shall meet during the twenty-four hours prior to the Annual Meeting of the Society, and at such other times as the President shall convene them. The Board of Directors shall have power to act on all matters concerning the activities and business of the Society, shall authorize the expenditure of the Society's funds and provide for the proper auditing of its accounts, and shall have the power to act for the Society in all matters of policy and program between Annual Meetings. It shall present to the Annual Meeting a report of its actions, which report shall be subject to approval of the members present. Seven of the members shall constitute a quorum for the Board of Directors.

There shall be an Executive Committee of the Board of Directors, consisting of the President, Vice President, and at least two members of the Board of Directors appointed by the President. The Executive Committee shall be responsible for planning the program for the Annual Meeting, shall prepare and present to the Board of Directors an agenda for each of its meetings, and shall otherwise advise the Board in the discharge of its responsibilities. The Executive Committee shall have power to act, if necessary, for the Board of Directors between its meetings. The Executive Director shall be an ex officio member of the Executive Committee.

ARTICLE VII

Archivist

The Archivist shall be appointed for a term of four years by the Board of Directors and confirmed by a majority vote of the membership present and voting at the earliest Annual Meeting. The Archivist may be reappointed. The Archivist shall see that materials are collected for the Society's archives; shall encourage members to contribute materials that may not be included in the files of the Society's officers; shall, working with the Executive Director, the President, the Editor or Co-editors of the Journal, and any other appropriate persons, make regular deposits to the archives accompanied by directories of file titles in each shipment; and shall be a liaison between the Society and the library that is the official repository of the archives.

ARTICLE VIII

Committees

Section 1. Nominating Committee

The Nominating Committee shall be chaired by a member of the Board of Directors and consist of four other members of the Society (not members of the Board of Directors) appointed by the President from among those present at the Annual Meeting. The Nominating Committee shall present at the Annual Meeting nominations to fill expiring terms and vacancies. Nominations for any office may also be made from the floor, subject to the movers having the person's consent to be nominated.

Section 2. Program Committee

The Program Committee shall have authority to determine the content of the program of the SCE Annual Meeting, with the exception of the SCE plenary speakers and conference theme, which shall be chosen by the President.  The Program Committee shall be chaired by the President and shall include the Vice-President and the immediate past President, and one member appointed by the president for that year only. The Program Committee shall also include at least three additional members from the elected members of the Board of Directors. The Executive Director shall serve on the Program Committee with voice but no vote.  The Board of Directors or, with the approval of the Board of Directors, the Program Committee itself, shall have the authority to include more participants in the selection process, provided that (1) the additional participants be restricted to electronic voting only so that they do not require transportation to the face-to-face meeting of the Program Committee, (2) the additional participants and the terms of their appointment shall be communicated to the membership as a whole, and (3) no less than 60 percent of the votes deciding the content of the program shall be cast by representatives elected directly by the membership as a whole.  Weighted voting may be used.

Section 3. Other Committees

The President may appoint such other committees as are necessary.

Articles IX-X: Publications and Sections

ARTICLE IX

Publications

Section 1. Authorization

The Society shall publish at least once each year a volume containing selected papers presented at the Annual Meeting, normally including the presidential address, and such professional materials as may be determined and arranged by the Editor or Co-editors and the Editorial Board charged with its planning and production.

Section 2. Name

This publication shall be called the Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics, hereafter referred to as the Journal.

Section 3. Editor/Co-editors

An Editor or Co-editors shall be appointed by the Board of Directors, following a search, and confirmed for a term of five years by majority vote of the membership present and voting at the earliest Annual Meeting. The Editor or Co-editors, in consultation with the Editorial Board, shall be responsible for soliciting and selecting materials to be included in the Journal, for overseeing the publication process, for supervising and assisting with promotion of sales, and for delivering papers presented at the Annual Meeting and submitted to the Journal to the Society Archivist. The Editor or Co-editors shall report on the work of the Journal to the membership through the Board of Directors and shall present to the Board of Directors an annual budget for publishing and publicizing the Journal.

Section 4. Editorial Board

An Editorial Board of no fewer than six (6) members shall advise and assist the Editor or Co-editors in the preparation and publication of the Journal. Members of this Board shall serve three-year staggered terms. They shall be appointed by the President of the Society in consultation with the Editor or Co-editors and the Board of Directors.

Section 5. Paper Selection

At the discretion of the authors, papers presented at the Annual Meeting shall be considered for inclusion in the Journal. The Editor or Co-editors and the Editorial Board shall determine procedures and criteria for paper selection. They shall appoint additional persons to assist in the review and assessment of these papers. Final decisions on publication shall reside with the Editor or Co-editors, guided by the advice of the Editorial Board.

ARTICLE X

Sections

Section 1. Authorization of Sections

The Board of Directors may authorize the formation of, and establish the boundaries of, regional sections of the Society. It may also revoke such authorization or redefine such boundaries.

Section 2. Membership and Section Officers

The membership of a section shall be drawn from members in good standing with the Society and who are resident within the boundaries of the regional section. Sections may elect whatever officers they deem appropriate. One officer shall be designated to provide an annual report to the Society's Board of Directors.

Section 3. Finances

The Board of Directors may allot funds to support the activities of sections when it is desirable to do so. No section shall levy additional membership dues.

Section 4. Meetings

Sections may arrange meetings at appropriate times, provided they do not conflict with the Annual Meeting of the Society.

ARTICLE XI

Amendments

These By-Laws may be amended by vote of the majority of the members present and voting at the Annual Meeting, the Call to Meeting shall contain notice of any proposed amendment, and shall include a copy or summary of the amendment and state the general nature of the amendment. The Board of Directors shall discuss the proposed amendment at a meeting of the Board prior to the Annual Meeting, and shall take a consultative vote regarding whether it should be adopted, the results of which vote shall be presented by the President or the Executive Director to the membership at the Annual Meeting prior to the vote of the members regarding the proposed amendment.

These By-Laws may also be amended by vote of the majority of the Board of Directors, which shall exercise this power between Annual Meetings only to make clerical or minor ministerial changes to the By-Laws, or to make changes necessary to conform to applicable law or to protect fundamental legal or financial interests of the Society. In the event that the Board of Directors exercises this power to amend the By-Laws, it shall provide notice of the amendment and its rationale to the membership in the Call to Meeting.

Coda to the By-Laws

Society of Christian Ethics
Declaration of Professional Commitments

The purpose of the Society of Christian Ethics is to promote scholarly work in the field of Christian ethics and in the relation of Christian ethics to other traditions of ethics and to social, economic, political, and cultural problems; to encourage and improve the teaching of these fields in colleges, universities and theological schools; and to provide a community of discourse and debate for those engaged professionally within these general fields. (By-laws, Art. II) In pursuit of this purpose members of the Society have particular professional commitments and responsibilities.

As scholars in the field of ethics we hold ourselves to a standard of free, rigorous, and intellectually honest inquiry aiming to advance moral understanding, especially in regard to theologically informed perspectives. Our examination of moral issues shall respect the dignity of persons whose practices and positions we study. Likewise, our engagement with other disciplines and ethical and religious traditions shall be conducted with the aim of mutual learning and understanding. We seek to promote critical and constructive understandings of justice, the well being of society and the good of the wider creation.

As participants in institutions we will foster just relationships with their members and constituencies -- especially students, graduate assistants, colleagues, staff, clients, and patients -- as well as with the communities these institutions affect.

As educators we will strive to improve the methods and intellectual depth of our teaching. We will exercise our authority justly with concern for the development of our students, respecting their dignity and the boundaries appropriate to professional interaction.

As members of the Society we will conduct inquiry, debate and other interactions with colleagues openly, fairly, and respectfully. We will execute our duties competently and justly without prejudice toward those with different values and viewpoints. We will welcome and take action to ensure the full participation of new and junior members and those who bring new voices to our conversations.

In recent years we have become keenly aware that certain conduct so clearly affronts the dignity of persons that it contravenes the minimal conditions for participation in our profession. Accordingly, in activities that occur under the auspices of the Society we will neither practice nor tolerate any form of harassment or unjust discrimination, in deed or word, based on race, sex, nationality, ethnicity, religious community, sexual orientation, age, or physical condition. Neither will we practice nor tolerate plagiarism, copyright infringement, and unacknowledged use of the research of others. (Cf. By-laws, Art. III, Sec. 3.) Persons who engage in such conduct within the Society's activities shall be subject to whatever grievance procedures the Society may adopt.

We will publicize these commitments and renew them by regular examination and revision.

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N.B. The text of the By-Laws and Coda is based on the document as amended at the 2006 Society of Christian Ethics annual meeting.

Standards of Professional Conduct

You may download the full document by clicking the PDF icon.  You may read each section separately by clicking the links below.

Section 1: Aspirations

The purpose of the Society of Christian Ethics is to promote scholarly work in the field of Christian ethics and in the relation of Christian ethics to other traditions of ethics and to social, economic, political, and cultural problems; to encourage and improve the teaching of these fields in colleges, universities and theological schools; and to provide a community of discourse and debate for those engaged professionally within these general fields. (By-laws, Art. II) In pursuit of this purpose members of the Society have particular professional commitments and responsibilities.

As scholars in the field of ethics we hold ourselves to a standard of free, rigorous, and intellectually honest inquiry aiming to advance moral understanding, especially in regard to theologically informed perspectives. Our examination of moral issues shall respect the dignity of persons whose practices and positions we study. Likewise, our engagement with other disciplines and ethical and religious traditions shall be conducted with the aim of mutual learning and understanding. We seek to promote critical and constructive understandings of justice, the well being of society and the good of the wider creation.

As participants in institutions we will foster just relationships with their members and constituencies -- especially students, graduate assistants, colleagues, staff, clients, and patients -- as well as with the communities these institutions affect.

As educators we will strive to improve the methods and intellectual depth of our teaching. We will exercise our authority justly with concern for the development of our students, respecting their dignity and the boundaries appropriate to professional interaction.

As members of the Society we will conduct inquiry, debate and other interactions with colleagues openly, fairly, and respectfully. We will execute our duties competently and justly without prejudice toward those with different values and viewpoints. We will welcome and take action to ensure the full participation of new and junior members and those who bring new voices to our conversations.

Certain conduct so clearly affronts the dignity of persons that it contravenes the minimal conditions for participation in our profession. Accordingly, in activities that occur under the auspices of the Society we will neither practice nor tolerate any form of harassment or unjust discrimination, in deed or word, based on race, sex, nationality, ethnicity, religious community, sexual orientation, age, or physical condition. Neither will we practice nor tolerate plagiarism, copyright infringement, and unacknowledged use of the research of others. (Cf. By-laws, Art. III, Sec. 3.) Persons who engage in such conduct within the Society's activities shall be subject to the grievance procedures the Society adopts, as explained below.[fn]To this point, this Section 1 is taken from the “Declaration of Professional Commitments”, which was appended to SCE Bylaws at the 2006 annual meeting.[/fn]

Section 2: Professional Conduct Statement

The primary purpose of this document is to promote the commitments outlined in the paragraphs above by adopting standards for the professional conduct of our members, and setting forth a grievance procedure for their reinforcement. These standards, organized under three headings, aim to protect the goods of our society, to protect members from being treated in such a way that they cannot enjoy the full benefits of membership and activity in the Society, and to educate all members about that standards of behavior that membership in our scholarly community requires.

It is our responsibility, as a community of professionals, to develop and sustain our own standards of conduct. We therefore publicize these commitments and standards, and commit to renewing them by regular examination and, if appropriate, revision. Questions and concerns, and especially reports and complaints of violations of professional conduct, will be listened to, taken seriously, and responded to fairly and constructively.

These standards apply to all members of the SCE when they are involved in meetings and activities directly connected with the Society’s work. These standards also will be shared with invited speakers and other non-members who register for SCE meetings.

A. Respect for difference. We commit ourselves to sustaining a secure and open environment for discussion in the public spaces of our annual meetings. We expect, from ourselves individually and each other, thoughtful and constructive analysis and reflection—discourse which serves to invite, rather than diminish or exclude the participation of those to whom and about whom we are speaking. We respect each other through the civil language that we employ in panels, presentations and conversation. We recognize that vigorous expression of disagreement about ethical matters does not itself count as disrespect for difference; we commit ourselves to expressing even vigorous disagreement in a civil way.

Disrespect for difference occurs when members use abrasive and hurtful words, or engage in insensitive and demeaning conduct, unjust discrimination based on race, sex, nationality, ethnicity, religious community, sexual orientation, age, or physical condition—in short, and any behavior which impedes particular individuals or groups from fully participating in and enjoying the life of the Society. Any words or actions of this sort violate this standard when they contribute to an atmosphere of intimidation or contempt.

B. Respect for personal integrity. We commit ourselves to honoring the physical, moral, and sexual integrity of all SCE members. In all of our professional interactions connected with the SCE, we will treat fellow members with the equal regard due to them as fellow human beings and fellow professionals, according to the norms of justice, honesty, fairness, and care. We recognize that each of us has a right to claim our own physical safety and security, as well as to make our own decisions and keep our own commitments in matters concerning romantic and sexual relationships. Participation in the roles, activities, and events of the SCE should depend solely upon professional interest and competence. No one’s claim to participation should be conditioned upon a threat, implicit or explicit, to their personal integrity.

Disrespect for personal integrity can take several different forms in the context of SCE meetings, particularly in the context of the annual meeting at a hotel. The use of hotel bedrooms for professional purposes can create the appearance of a threat to personal integrity. Consequently, such private rooms should not be used for functions appropriate to public spaces, such as interviews, meetings or official SCE social gatherings. In public spaces, disrespect is expressed through remarks, jokes or behavior which belittle, bully, harass, or exploit other members; the display or use of degrading or pornographic images for purposes unconnected to a professional presentation; the expression of lewd remarks or conduct; and the surreptitious administration of alcohol or drugs to reduce sexual inhibitions. As teachers and scholars of ethics, we are particularly sensitive to the way in which differentials of power and position, such as those between students and teachers, or junior colleagues and senior colleagues, can create or exacerbate threats to personal integrity. Unwelcome sexual advances, including unwanted touching, violate the integrity of both parties. Persistent and unwelcome social invitations threaten to violate personal integrity, particularly when the intent is to extract sexual favors in exchange for professional advantage.

C. Respect for intellectual integrity. No scholarly progress can be made without freedom of thought, speech, and publication. The Society encourages its members to formulate and present their ideas, arguments, and research with freely exercised imagination and responsibility, in accordance with internalized standards of professional judgment. Good scholarly work requires a high degree of discretion exercised by members in determining the appropriate context and presentation of academic material. Respect for intellectual integrity also requires us to accurately present the work of other scholars with whom we are in conversation, particularly if we disagree with them. Finally, we must appropriately acknowledge our debt to the scholarly endeavors of others, by citing them fully and fairly in accordance with prevailing scholarly standards. Respect for intellectual integrity consists in protecting the conditions for and honoring the fruits of the vocation to scholarship, in order to facilitate a creative, honest, and rigorous scholarly conversation.

Disrespect for intellectual integrity can be expressed in several ways. Three of the more egregious kinds of violations include incidents where: 1) a member or members intimidate, ridicule or otherwise wrongfully inhibit others from a full and genuine expression of their ideas; 2) a member presents the ideas or positions of another scholar or source in a willfully or negligently incomplete or biased way; and 3) a member misrepresents the ideas from a source as his or her own, by willfully or negligently failing to acknowledge the source in accordance with prevailing scholarly standards.

The list is meant to be illustrative rather than exhaustive, and the possible violations are framed in a general way so as to allow appropriate latitude for a determination to be made as to whether a given incident constitutes a violation.

Section 3: Grievance Procedure

1. The Purpose of the Grievance Procedure is to provide structure and guidance for responding to evident violations. The procedure may be applied only to grievances between members of the SCE, that is, to members of the SCE aggrieved by the conduct of fellow members in the context of meetings and activities directly connected with the Society's work.[fn]SCE employees are expected to know and abide by these standards as well, but it should be noted that they are protected by state and federal employment laws, including laws against harassment and discrimination. Guests, including guest speakers, will be encouraged to hold themselves accountable to these standards by means of a brief summary of this document, supplied to them in their registration packets.[/fn]

The procedure is intentionally flexible, allowing considerable scope for discretionary exercise of its provisions in response to morally relevant differences in particular cases, such as the gravity of the alleged misconduct and whether or not it was intentional. The overarching goal is to reestablish a respectful and just environment for inquiry and discourse at SCE meetings. Where possible, the procedure should aim at achieving reconciliation on fair terms. In some cases, the duty to maintain the values and commitments of the SCE may require the application of sanctions (e.g., suspension or expulsion). Any intervention should aim at supporting and strengthening the SCE's efforts to safeguard respect for difference, personal integrity and intellectual integrity.

2. The Professional Conduct Committee is the sole body authorized to interpret and apply the grievance procedure; evaluate complaints brought under it; and make recommendations to the Board of Directors in response to such complaints.

Members of the PCC are appointed by the President for staggered three-year terms, to ensure continuity of experience on the Committee. Since respect for intellectual integrity requires vigilance, sensitivity and courage to identify and remedy infractions, the members of the PCC should be chosen for their practical wisdom. They should be seasoned members of the SCE, who possess sound and sober judgment, as well as tact, discretion, and skill with people. In aggregate, they should represent the SCE community in all its diversity. If possible, the SCE should look into sending them to a relevant training program.

The PCC will review cases arising out of the formally constituted activities of the SCE if it deems the procedure of peer investigation and judgment to be an appropriate forum to address the alleged misconduct, and if it deems the SCE's resources to be adequate to yield a fair judgment. The PCC will not accept complaints it deems capricious or principally vindictive, nor will it attempt to obviate or preempt civil or legal proceedings, nor will it, except in unusual circumstances, pursue a case while the dispute is pending in another forum. Review of a complaint by the PCC should not be regarded as substitute for legal action.

3. The Grievance Procedure is designed for use during or soon after a formally constituted event of the SCE, normally the annual meeting. The swift passage of such events imposes limitations on the PCC’s ability to obtain information, provide due process, protect confidentiality, and resolve the case with effective mediation or retributive justice, as the case warrants.

A member should bring a grievance directly to the chair of the PCC, who ensures that all inquiries and complaints are properly undertaken and concluded. If any member of the PCC is named in the complaint, he or she will be replaced for that case by Presidential appointment. No person who has been accused in a complaint will participate in the investigation or resolution of the complaint.

When a grievance is brought to the chair of the PCC, the chair shall promptly assign a member of the PCC to handle the case as its representative.

In some situations, the PCC representative may find that an informal conversation with the complainant and the respondent members suffices to determine what happened and then to resolve a hurtful misunderstanding or repair an unintentional offense through mediation. If the mediation is successful, no written record shall be generated. The PCC member shall orally inform the chair of the PCC of the successful resolution of the incident.

For example, under Respect for Difference, if a member of the SCE uses a derogatory racial term in a conversation at the hotel bar, but doesn’t realize the term is offensive, the PCC member may explain its offensiveness and a sincere apology may be all that is required. Under Respect for Personal Integrity, a request for some form of sexual intimacy that was honestly but mistakenly believed to be welcome might be settled with a sincere apology. Under Respect for Intellectual Integrity, using material from the writings of another member without proper citation, but unintentionally and in a minor way, might be resolved with a sincere apology and a correction in the next issue of the JSCE.

A more formal procedure will be required if mediation fails or if the PCC representative judges that the offense was deliberate and/or serious enough to require more attention. The PCC representative shall ask the complainant whether he or she wishes to proceed further, and shall respect the complainant’s wishes in this regard.

For example, if a derogatory term was applied maliciously (a serious violation of respect for difference), or if sexual favors were requested in exchange for preferment or professional help (a serious violation of personal integrity), or if a citation was deliberately omitted (a serious violation of intellectual integrity)

If the complainant chooses to proceed, the PCC representative should inform the PCC chair, who should promptly convene the committee, by telephone if need be, to evaluate the complaint. By majority vote, the PCC may decide either to accept the complaint for full review or to decline to consider it. This decision should be based upon:

  • a judgment of its resources and competence to handle the matter;
  • the seriousness of the complaint;
  • the degree to which the complaint alleges specific violations of the SCE Code of Conduct;
  • the likelihood that the SCE will be able to make a positive contribution to resolving the problem; the availability of a more suitable forum, such as a university grievance procedure or the AAUP.

If the PCC decides to decline consideration of the complaint, the PCC representative will explain the decision to the complainant, and the respondent if aware of the complaint. No written record will be kept of the complaint or the PCC’s decision not to consider the case.

If the PCC decides to pursue the complaint, it will ask the PCC representative promptly and impartially to solicit 1) a written statement from the complainant. The statement will be furnished to the respondent, with a request for 2) a written response. The PCC representative also will solicit additional relevant evidence. The solicitation of comments from witnesses needs to be done delicately and with circumspection. The PCC representative will write 3) an investigatory report detailing additional evidence in the case.

(Note: The PCC will protect the privacy of both the complainant and the respondent in every way possible during the process of the complaint and thereafter. However, all parties should realize that the confidentiality of the SCE proceeding is not protected against legally mandated disclosure if it falls within the scope of a subsequent lawsuit.)

The PCC will then meet in person or by conference call to consider the case, including the statements by the complainant and the respondent, and the investigatory report by the PCC representative.

  1. The PCC might conclude that there is insufficient evidence of violation to warrant any action, and therefore officially close the investigation. The chair of the PCC shall so notify the complainant and the respondent. No written record will be maintained of the incident.
  2. The PCC might conclude that a violation has occurred and impose a sanction, if it deems a sanction to be warranted. Sanctions are imposed by a majority vote of the PCC (excluding the investigating PCC member).
  3. Possible sanctions include:
    • Sending a letter of reprimand to the respondent.
    • Requiring the offender to undergo some sort of education regarding the Society's professional commitments and appropriate and inappropriate behaviors, and to provide documentation to the PCC that this training has been completed. Failure to comply may result in the rescinding of membership.
    • Recommending to the Board to suspend, restrict, or terminate the membership of the respondent, in accordance with Article III, Section 7 of the By-laws.
  4. If a sanction is imposed, the chair of the PCC shall prepare a written report justifying the action taken. This report should include, as appendices, the statements of the complainant and respondent, as well as the PCC representative’s investigatory report.
  5. If the recommendation to the Board is made to suspend, restrict, or terminate membership (3c), the following additional procedures must be followed.
    • The PCC shall provide the Board with copies of the PCC chair’s report, including all appendices.
    • The complainant and respondent will be provided a copy of the chair’s report, including all appendices. They will be offered an opportunity to make a written response to the PCC’s decision.
    • The sanction of suspension or restriction requires a majority vote of the Board of Directors. The sanction of expulsion requires a two-thirds (2/3) vote of the Board. The vote of the Board is final. 4) The President shall notify the complainant and the respondent of the Board’s decision in writing.
    1. Records
        • For each case in which a violation has been found to have occurred, the Executive Director shall maintain in the office file one copy of the complete case file, which includes the PCC chair’s report, including all appendices. If applicable, it shall also include additional materials submitted to the Board, and the written decision of the Board. 2) These documents shall be made available only to those who serve in the office of President, the Executive Director, and the Chair of the PCC, and shall be destroyed in five year’s time. 3) All other copies shall be destroyed immediately after the PCC or Board meetings dealing with the case have concluded.

        4. After the Grievance procedure.

        The decisions rendered by the PCC are final, and may not be appealed by the complainant, respondent or a third party to the Board or to the entire membership. The only exception is a PCC recommendation for suspending, restricting or terminating membership as set forth in 3)c above, which may be appealed to the Board. However, further action by the PCC may be needed if the PCC learns, after investigating a complaint, that the grievance procedure has been misused:

        a. If a complainant knowingly made a false complaint or knowingly provided false information regarding a complaint. The SCE prohibits the use of false testimony, and the PCC or the Board may take disciplinary action.

        b. If retaliation is taken against any member, or against an employee of SCE filing a complaint against a member, or against the person accused. The SCE prohibits such retaliation, and the PCC or the Board may take additional disciplinary action.

        c. If the confidences of the complainant, the respondent, or other parties directly involved are abused by the members of the PCC or the Board. The SCE prohibits disclosure of confidential material unless required by law or to protect the safety of a party or a third person. Violations of confidence may warrant additional sanctions by the PCC or the Board. Whether or not these misuses of the grievance procedure exacerbate the original complaint, they are themselves violations of respect for personal and intellectual integrity, and so are subject to the same disciplinary standards.

        5. Report to the Board

        The PCC chair is the official liaison to the Board, President, and Executive Director and must report every inquiry and formal complaint. The PCC Chair shall prepare a written annual report to the Board, describing the cases it has dealt during the previous year in the following way:

        • The PCC chair shall identify the number and general type of cases resolved by a PCC member on an informal basis.
        • The PCC chair shall describe in general terms, which omit all direct and indirect identification of the parties, each case which the PCC declined to consider.
        • The PCC chair shall prepare an abbreviated version of the case report of each case to which the PCC has decided to give full consideration, omitting all direct and indirect identification of the parties.

        6. Report to the Membership

        The PCC Chair shall prepare a short oral report, to be given at the annual meeting, summarizing the annual report to the Board, but identifying cases, resolved or declined, only according to the kind of violation involved (regarding disrespect for difference, personal integrity, or intellectual integrity).

        Scholarship and Family Care

        The Women's Caucus of the Society of Christian Ethics has responded to the changes in the shape and demography of the academy in light of the increasing number of women scholars by commissioning the two documents available below. The membership endorsed the "Enabling a Family-Friendly Institution" document during the business meeting at the 2009 annual meeting.

        Archives

        The Society has a rich history of growing as its members have enlarged and diversified the focus of their work, and as new members, and new categories of members are attracted by such expanding conversations. You may read the history to gain a sense of how the identity of the Society has grown during its first half-century. You also may explore the following pages to view past leadership including officers, charter members who acted on their common vision, or the timeline that marks the milestones of change and growth.  Programs from past meetings can be accessed via the Past Meetings page.

        Charter Members

        Charter members include those who were members and/or who attended the meetings in 1959 and 1960.

        **Deceased, *Active

        Adams, James Luther **
        Barnett, Das Kelley **
        Beach, Waldo  **
        Bennett, John C. **
        Boorman, J. Arthur 
        Bryan, George McLeod **
        Chakerian, Charles G.**
        Dorey, Frank D. 
        Easter, George H. **
        Elman, Paul  **
        Fildey, Harold W. **
        Fitch, Robert E. **
        Fletcher, Joseph F. **
        Forell, George W.
        Gardner, Frank H.
        Gardner, E. Clinton  **
        Gustafson, James M.*
        Heimann, Edward 
        Hertz, Karl H. D. **
        Hill, Daniel O.
        Horton, Walter Marshall **
        Jackson, Douglas E.
        Jay, C. Douglas
        Kincheloe, Samuel C. **
        Kolbe, Henry E. **
        Lazareth, William H. **
        Leiffer, Murray H. **
        Lewis, Frank B.
        Loescher, Frank S. **
        Long Jr., Edward LeRoy*
        Maston, T. B. **
        Mollegan, Albert T. **
        Morris, William **
        Muehl, William
        Niebuhr, H. Richard **
        Obenhaus, Victor **
        Outler, Albert C. **
        Pemberton, Prentiss L. **
        Pope, Liston  **
        Potter, Ralph*
        Ramsey, Paul  **
        Ranson, Guy H. **
        Rasmussen, Albert T. **
        Rutenber, Culbert G. **
        Satterwhite, John H. **
        Seitz, Oscar J. F. **
        Sikes, Walter W. **
        Smith, Edmund 
        Smith, Kenneth L. **
        Smythe, Lewis 
        Stob, Henry  **
        Sturm, Douglas*
        Thompson, Kenneth W. 
        Turnbull, John W. **
        Underwood, Kenneth **
        Wade, Donald V.
        Weber, Theodore R.*

        History of Officers

        SCE Board Members

        Class of 2017
        Jennifer Harvey
        Laura Stivers
        Jonathan Tran
        Class of 2016
        Lois Malcolm
        Cynthia Moe-Lobeda
        Emily Reimer-Barry
        Class of 2015
        Jennifer Beste
        Melanie Harris
        Grace Kao
        Class of 2014
        Gloria Albrecht
        David Gushee
        M. Therese Lysaught
        Class of 2013
        Aristotle Papanikolaou
        Rebecca Todd Peters
        Diane Yeager
        Class of 2012
        John Kelsay
        Irene Oh
        Glen Stassen
        Class of 2011
        Maria Antonaccio
        Jan Jans
        William O’Neill, S.J.
        Class of 2010
        Diana Fritz Cates
        Miguel A. De La Torre
        Christine Pohl
        Class of 2009
        Daniel Finn (replaced by Barbara Hilkert Andolsen in 08)
        Thomas Massaro, S.J.
        Julie Hanlon Rubio
        Class of 2008
        Pamela Brubaker
        Audrey Chapman
        Cheryl Kirk-Duggan
        Class of 2007
        Nigel John Biggar
        Jennifer Herdt
        Mary Jo Iozzio
        Class of 2006
        Edward C. Vacek
        Marcia Y. Riggs
        David H. Smith
        Class of 2005
        M. Cathleen Kaveny
        James F. Keenan, S.J.
        Stephen J. Pope
        Class of 2004
        James M. Childs, Jr.
        Lois K. Daly
        Maura Ryan
        Class of 2003
        Simeon Ilesanmi
        Rebekah Miles
        Susan A. Ross
        Class of 2002
        Emilie M. Townes
        Cristina Traina
        Allen Verhey
        Class of 2001
        Vigen Guroian
        Timothy P. Jackson
        Stephen E. Lammers
        Class of 2000
        John Langan
        William Werpehowski
        Sondra Ely Wheeler
        Class of 1999
        Patricia Beattie Jung
        William Schweiker
        Timothy M. Sedwick
        Class of 1998
        Gilbert Meilaender, Jr.
        Gene Outka
        Jean Porter
        Pacific Section
        John Crossley
        Class of 1997
        Christine Firer Hinze
        Douglas F. Ottati
        Darryl M. Trimiew
        Class of 1996
        Cynthia S.W. Crysdale
        Robert Michael Franklin
        John Pawlikowski
        Class of 1995
        Christine Gudorf
        Ronald Stone
        Raymond L. Whitehead
        Class of 1994
        June O’Connor
        Stephen Charles Mott
        William C. Spohn
        Class of 1993
        Karen Bloomquist
        Roger D. Hatch
        Marjorie R. Maguire
        Class of 1992
        Daniel Rush Finn
        Lois Gehr Livezey
        Dennis McCann
        Class of 1991
        Ronald Green
        David Hollenbach
        Anne E. Patrick
        Class of 1990
        Katie G. Cannon
        Jon P. Gunnemann
        Robin W. Lovin
        Class of 1989
        Ann Neale
        Jane Cary Peck
        Thomas Shannon
        Class of 1988
        John H. Cartwright
        James Gaffney
        Carol Robb
        Class of 1987
        Lisa Sowle Cahill
        Stanley Harakas
        Larry L. Rasmussen
        Class of 1986
        Stanley Hauerwas
        Karen Lebacqz
        James B. Nelson
        Class of 1985
        James Bresnahan
        Riggins Earl, Jr.
        John Raines
        Class of 1984
        Elizabeth Betternhausen
        John Boyle
        Enoch Oglesby
        Class of 1983
        Charles Brown
        June O’Connor
        Franklin Sherman
        Class of 1982
        Thomas Olgletree
        Ralph Potter
        Isabel Rogers
        Class of 1981
        George Crowell, Jr.
        Peter Paris
        John Howard Yoder
        Class of 1980
        Beverly Harrison
        Dieter Hessel
        Major Jones
        Class of 1979
        RolandDelattre
        Daniel C. Maguire
        Gayrude Wilmore
        Class of 1978
        Terence R. Anderson
        Margaret A. Farley
        Glenn H. Stassen
        Class of 1977
        Paul K. Deats, Jr.
        Charles H. Reynolds
        Donald W. Shriver, Jr.
        Class of 1976
        James F. Childress
        Richard A. McCormick
        Allan M. Parrent
        Class of 1975
        Marlene Halpin
        Andrew M. Spaulding
        J. Philip Wogaman
        Class of 1974
        J. Arthur Boorman
        Kieran Nolan
        Preston N. Williams
        Class of 1973
        Robert A. Gessert
        Daniel Maguire
        Joseph R. Washington
        Class of 1972
        Frederick S. Carney
        Max Stackhouse
        Theodore R. Weber
        Class of 1971
        Joseph F. Fletcher
        Alan Geyer
        Dan D. Rhoades
        Class of 1970
        Charles E. Curran
        John M. Swomley, Jr.
        Charles C. West
        Class of 1969
        C. Douglas Jay
        Edward LeRoy Long, Jr.
        Warren Reich
        Class of 1968
        James Gustafson
        Paul Harrison
        Robert Lee
        Class of 1967
        Robert C. Batchelder
        Harold Lunger
        Douglas Sturm
        Class of 1966
        Henlee Barnett
        John C. Bennett
        E. Clinton Gardner (replaced by Donovan Smucker in 64)
        Class of 1965
        John Satterwhite
        Walter Sikes
        Donald V. Wade
        Class of 1964
        Joseph L. Allen
        Paul Geren
        Prentiss Pemberton
        Class of 1963
        Waldo Beach
        Murray Leiffer
        Harvey Seifert
         

        Officers

        Year Elected President Executive Director*
        2013 Allen Verhey Stacey Floyd-Thomas
        2012 Miguel De La Torre Stacey Floyd-Thomas
        2011 Stanley Hauerwas Stacey Floyd-Thomas
        2010
        Douglas Ottati
        Stewart W. Herman
        2009 Daniel Finn Stewart W. Herman
        2008 Darryl Trimiew Stewart W. Herman
        2007 Christine Gudorf Stewart W. Herman
        2006 William Werpehowski Stewart W. Herman
        2005 Jean Porter Regina Wentzel Wolfe
        2004 John Langan, S.J. Regina Wentzel Wolfe
        2003 June E. O'Connor Regina Wentzel Wolfe
        2002 William F. May Regina Wentzel Wolfe
        2001 Gene Outka Regina Wentzel Wolfe
        2000 Harlan R. Beckley Dennis P. McCann
        1999 Robin W. Lovin Dennis P. McCann
        1998 Ronald M. Green Dennis P. McCann
        1997 Lisa Sowle Cahill Dennis P. McCann
        1996 Charles H. Reynolds Dennis P. McCann
        1995 David Hollenbach John H. Cartwright
        1994 Jon P. Gunnemann John H. Cartwright
        1993 Margaret A. Farley John H. Cartwright
        1992 Joseph L. Allen John H. Cartwright
        1991 Peter Paris John H. Cartwright
        1990 Larry L. Rasmussen Charles H. Reynolds
        1989 Karen Lebacqz Charles H. Reynolds
        1988 Theodore R. Weber Charles H. Reynolds
        1987 John H. Yoder + Charles H. Reynolds
        1986 Max L. Stackhouse Terence R. Anderson
        1985 Major J. Jones + Terence R. Anderson
        1984 Alan Geyer Terence R. Anderson
        1983 Thomas W. Ogletree Joseph L. Allen
        1982 Beverly W. Harrison + Joseph L. Allen
        1981 Daniel C. Maguire Joseph L. Allen
        1980 Douglas Sturm Joseph L. Allen
        1979 Donald Shriver, Jr. Max L. Stackhouse
        1978 Walter Muelder + Max L. Stackhouse
        1977 Waldo Beach + Max L. Stackhouse
        1976 J. Philip Wogaman Max L. Stackhouse
        1975 Preston N. Williams Franklin Sherman
        1974 Roger L. Shinn Franklin Sherman
        1973 Charles C. West Franklin Sherman
        1972 Edward L. Long, Jr. Franklin Sherman
        1971 Charles E. Curran Douglas Sturm
        1970 John Satterwhite+ Douglas Sturm
        1969 James F. Gustafson Douglas Sturm
        1968 James Luther Adams+ Douglas Sturm
        1967 Murray H. Leiffer+ E. Clinton Gardner
        1966 Victor Obenhaus E. Clinton Gardner
        1965 Paul Elmen+ E. Clinton Gardner
        1964 Prentiss Pemberton + E. Clinton Gardner
        1963 Walter Sikes + Das Kelley Barnett
        1962 Paul Ramsey + Das Kelley Barnett
        1961 E. Clinton Gardner + Das Kelley Barnett
        1960 John C. Bennett + Das Kelley Barnett
        1959 Henry E. Kolbe + Das Kelley Barnett

        + Deceased
        *In 1994 the title of the Executive Secretary was changed to Executive Director.

        JSCE Board

        *Publication renamed to The Journal of The Society of Christian Ethics in 2002

        Mark Allman and Tobias Winright, co-editors; Kathryn Blanchard, Book Review Editor
        2018:  
        2017: Michelle Clifton-Soderstrom, Willis Jenkins, Judith Kay, Nimi Wariboko, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ? ?; SJE Representative: ?; SSME Representative: ?
        2016: Patrick McCormick, Ruben Rosario Roddriguez, Jonathan Tran, Thelathia (Nikki) Young, Michelle Clifton-Soderstrom, Willis Jenkins, Judith Kay, Nimi Wariboko, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?,?; SJE Representative: ?; SSME Representative: ?
        2015: Ki Joo (KC) Choi, Joan Henriksen Hellyer, Scott Paeth, Angela Sims, Patrick McCormick, Ruben Rosario Roddriguez, Jonathan Tran, Thelathia (Nikki) Young, Michelle Clifton-Soderstrom, Willis Jenkins, Judith Kay, Nimi Wariboko, ?, ?, ?,?; SJE Representative: ?; SSME Representative: ?
        2014: Elizabeth Bucar, Nathan Colborne, Bryan Massingale, Aana Vigen, Ki Joo (KC) Choi, Joan Henriksen Hellyer, Scott Paeth, Angela Sims, Patrick McCormick, Ruben Rosario Roddriguez, Jonathan Tran, Thelathia (Nikki) Young, Michelle Clifton-Soderstrom, Willis Jenkins, Judith Kay, Nimi Wariboko; SJE Representative: ?; SSME Representative: ?

        Mary Jo Iozzio and Patricia Beattie Jung, co-editors; Lois Malcolm, Book Review Editor

        2013: Christina Astorga, John Carlson, Maria Teresa Davila, Laura Hartman, Elizabeth Bucar, Nathan Colborne, Bryan Massingale, Aana Vigen, Ki Joo (KC) Choi, Joan Henriksen Hellyer, Scott Paeth, Angela Sims, Patrick McCormick, Ruben Rosario Roddriguez, Jonathan Tran, Thelathia (Nikki) Young; SJE Representative: ??; SSME Representative: ??
        2012: Cristina Traina, Ronald Duty, John Shelley, Lloyd Steffen, Christina Astorga, John Carlson, Tobias Winright, Laura Hartman, Elizabeth Bucar, Nathan Colborne, Bryan Massingale, Aana Vigen, Ki Joo (KC) Choi, Joan Henriksen Hellyer, Scott Paeth, Angela Sims; SJE Representative: Jonathan Crane; SSME Representative: Elizabeth Barre
        2011: David Gushee, Judith W. Kay, Douglas J. Schuurman, William Werpehowski, Cristina Traina, Amy Laura Hall, John Shelley, Lloyd Steffen, Christina Astorga, Maria Teresa Davila, John Carlson, Laura Hartman, Elizabeth Bucar, Nathan Colborne, Bryan Massingale, Aana Vigen, Jonathan Crane (SJE Representative), Sohail Hashmi (SSME Representative)
        2010: Linda Hogan, Christopher Vogt, Traci West, David Gushee, Judith W. Kay, Douglas J. Schuurman, William Werpehowski, Stacey Floyd-Thomas, Amy Laura Hall, John Shelley, Lloyd Steffen, Christina Astorga, Jonathan Crane (SJE Representative), Maria Teresa Davila, Sohail Hashmi (SSME Representative)
        2009: Dov Nelkin, Laura Stivers, Tobias Winright, Linda Hogan, Christopher Vogt, Traci West, David Gushee, Judith W. Kay, Douglas J. Schuurman, William Werpehowski, Stacey Floyd-Thomas, Amy Laura Hall, John Shelley, Lloyd Steffen
        2008: Andrew Flescher, Dov Nelkin, Laura Stivers, Mark Allman, Sondra Wheeler, Tobias Winright, Linda Hogan, Christopher Vogt, Traci West, David Gushee, Judith W. Kay, Douglas J. Schuurman, William Werpehowski
        2007: Elizabeth Bounds, Andrew Flescher, James Nash, Brian Stiltner, Dov Nelkin, Laura Stivers, Mark Allman, Sondra Wheeler, Tobias Winright, Linda Hogan, Christopher Vogt, Traci West

        Christine E. Gudorf and Paul Lauritzen, co-editors

        2006: Elizabeth Bounds, Ann Mongoven, Andrew Flescher, James Nash, Andrea Vicini SJ, Brian Stiltner, Dov Nelkin, Laura Stivers
        2005: Elizabeth Bounds, Ann Mongoven, John Bowlin, Andrew Flescher, James Nash, Andrea Vicini SJ, Aaron L. Mackler, Brian Stiltner
        2004: Elizabeth Bounds, Ann Mongoven, John Bowlin, Margaret Mohrmann, Andrew Flescher, James Nash, Andrea Vicini, Aaron L. Mackler, William O’Neill, Brian Stiltner, Darryl Trimiew
        2003: Maria Antonnacio, John Bowlin, Miguel De La Torre, Travis Kroeker, Aaron Mackler, Margaret Mohrmann, William O’Neill SJ, Darryl Trimiew
        2002: Maria Antonnacio, John Bowlin, Miguel De La Torre, Travis Kroeker, Aaron Mackler, Margaret Mohrmann, William O’Neill SJ, Darryl Trimiew

        John Kelsay and Sumner B. Twiss, co-editors

        2001: John Bowlin, Simeon Ilesanmi, Cathleen Kaveny, Cheryl Kirk-Duggan, Margaret Mohrmann, Louis Newman, June O’Connor, William O’Neill SJ
        2000: Diana Fritz Cates, Simeon Ilesanmi, Cathleen Kaveny, Cheryl Kirk-Duggan, Paul Lauritzen, Louis Newman, June O’Connor, William O’Neill SJ
        1999: Martin Cook, Lois Daly, Simeon Ilesanmi, Cathleen Kaveny, Louis Newman, June O’Connor, Emilie Townes, Allen Verhey
        1998: Martin Cook, Lois Daly, Simeon Ilesanmi, Cathleen Kaveny, Louis Newman, June O’Connor, Emilie Townes, Allen Verhey
        1997: Martin Cook, Lois Daly, Simeon Ilesanmi, Cathleen Kaveny, Louis Newman, June O’Connor, Emilie Townes, Allen Verhey

        Harlan R. Beckley, editor

        1996: Terence Anderson, Lois Daly, John Kelsay, Richard Miller, Jean Porter, Sally Purvis, Terrence Reynolds, Marcia Riggs
        1995: Terence Anderson, Lois Daly, John Kelsay, Richard Miller, Jean Porter, Sally Purvis, Terrence Reynolds, Marcia Riggs
        1994: Terence Anderson, Charles Curran, Patricia B. Jung, Richard Miller, Jean Porter, Sally Purvis, Terrence Reyno!ds, Marcia Riggs
        1993: Charles Curran, Terence Anderson, William Schweiker, Patricia B. Jung, Marcia Riggs, Terrence Reynolds, Caro! Robb
        1992: Barbara Andolsen, Preston Williams, Caro! Robb, William Schwieker, Charles Curran, Patricia Jung

        Diane M. Yeager, editor

        1991: Hartan R. Beckley, Edward V. Vacek, Barbara H. Andolsen, Preston Williams, Caro! Robb, William Schweiker
        1990: Hartan R. Beckley, Edward V. Vacek, Barbara H. Andolsen, Preston Williams, William Schweiker, Carol Robb
        1989: Ruth Smith, Gilbert Meilaender, Hartan R. Becktey, Edward V. Vacek, Barbara H. Andolsen, Preston Williams
        1988: Enoch H. Oglesby, Ruth L. Smith, Harlan R. Beckley, Edward V. Vacek, Gilbert Meilaender, Barbara H. Andolsen
        1987: Robin W. Lovin, Enoch Oglesby, Warren T. Reich, Ruth Smith

        Alan B. Anderson, editor

        1986: Robin Lovin, Warren Reich, Enoch Oglesby, Ruth Smith
        1985: Jane Cary Peck, Warren Reich, Robin Lovin, Enoch Oglesby
        1984: Peter Paris, Jane Cary Peck, Robin Lovin, Warren Reich

        Larry L. Rasmussen, editor

        1983: Alan Anderson, David Hollenbach, Peter Paris, Jane Cary Peck
        1982: Alan Anderson, Lisa Cahili, David Hollenbach, Peter Paris

        Thomas W. Ogletree, editor

        1981: Alan Anderson, Lisa Cahill

        Nominations

        The attached excel document with the nominations history has the same information on three pages but sorted differently - by year, by name, by position.

        Timeline

        1955 22 people attended The American Society of Seminary Professors of Christian Social Ethics in the US and Canada, most as members of American Association of Theological Seminaries. This Society met annually through 1959.

        1959 American Society of Christian Social Ethics was founded, thanks largely to Das Kelley Barnett. It was structured to be governed by regional directors. Annual membership dues were set at $5.00. Program consisted of 2 panels in plenary sessions. Total cost of meeting: $586.35. Quorum for business meeting was 25, raised to 50 in 1978.
        First Presidential Address: Henry Kolbe, when being told that he needed to give a presidential address, stood up and recited his residential address. Panel of seven men (all but one were white) discussed “The Moderate Strategy in Race Relations.”

        1960 42 men attended meeting at Union Theology Seminary in New York City. Rooms cost $3.50 with 3 to a room. Program theme: Pedagogical Aspects of the Profession. Three other regional meetings were held at Vanderbilt, Perkins School of Theology, Emanuel College (Toronto), Garrett Biblical Institution (Evanston IL).

        1961 Program theme: Moral Problems Raised by War. Membership reached 117 (96 were teachers in theological schools or on faculties of divinity schools; 21 either teachers in college or university departments of religion, executives in denominational agencies or social action groups). The membership included 1 woman and 6 African Americans.

        1963 The position of vice-president was reconfigured to be that of president-designate. Roman Catholics were invited to attend, and 6 attended.

        1964 “Social” was dropped from title: American Society of Christian Ethics. Membership now included 2 women.

        1965 Program was organized into concurrent sessions for the first time: three presentations per session.

        1966 A new program format was tried: participants were to read papers in advance. This format was abandoned after 1967. Membership reached 140. Registration for annual meeting was charged for the first time: $2. The ASCE was granted tax-exempt status.

        1968 First (plenary) session on sexual ethics. Membership expanded to include students in Ph.D. programs. A Protestant worship service was added when the program was extended to Sunday.

        1969 A first task force was created, chaired by Alan Geyer, to explore theological education and international affairs. A first paper on Jewish ethics. Annual dues were raised to $10.00.

        1970 First president of color: John Satterwhite. The program focused on the “Black Agenda”. A second task force formed, to address white racism.

        1971 Membership reaches 319. Pacific region was established by 16 members (all but 2 from southern California). A third task force was established to work on issues raised by the trial of the “Catonsville Nine” for destroying draft records.

        1972 First paper on Roman Catholic heritage, by Warren Reich. First paper on “women’s liberation”, by Penelope Washburn. Book discussions were added to the program, and ten were discussed.

        1973 The Journal of Religious Ethics was launched, as was a task force to consider how to celebrate the nation’s bicentennial?

        1975 The Religious Studies Review was launched. For the first time,nominations exceeded the offices to be filled. Ever since, therehave beentwo candidates nominated for each SCEposition.

        1976 Dues were raised to $15. Membership reached 491, including 20 women. A further task force was created to study the relation between religion and law.

        1977 The program includes Interest Groups for the first time. First paper from an Eastern Orthodox perspective, by Stanley Harakas. First paper on the family, by Beverly Harrison. The Selected Papers was launched, later to become the Annual (1981) and ultimately the Journal of the SCE (2002).

        1979 Paul Ramsey stressed Evangelicals needed to be welcomed for the SCE to be truly national in scope.

        1980 Task force established regarding the relationship of Jewish and Christian Ethics. Members voted to keep “Christian” in the Society’s name rather than replace it with “Religious”.

        1981 Membership reaches 603. A sliding scale of dues was instituted, based on salary. The first issue of The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics appeared.

        1982 First woman president was elected: Beverly Harrison. Membership reached 664, including 15 African Americans.

        1983 Meeting registration fees were set at $15 for members, $18 for non-members. The SCE declined to meet in the National 4-H Center because this institution refused to allow the New Ways Ministry, Amnesty International, Interreligious Task Force on US Food Policy, Religious Task Force for El Salvador to use its space.

        1984 One-fifth of the papers given in the first 25 years focused on the “Black Agenda.”

        1988 Position of Archivist was established: Edward Leroy Long, Jr.

        1989 The SCE moved its state of incorporation to Tennessee, where it remains to this day.

        1993 Women’s Caucus was proposed.

        1995 Email addresses began to appear in the annually distributed directory.

        1997 Stephen Crocco becomes Archivist, while Edward Leroy Long, Jr., becomes Archivist emeritus

        1998 Student members organized a group, later creating a caucus.

        1999 The 21st Century Initiatives were launched.

        2001 The first woman was appointed as executive director: Regina Wolfe.

        2002 The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics was renamed The Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics. The JSCE began accepting advertisements. The program booklet was enlarged from book size to large format: 8 ½” x 11”.

        2003 President June O’Connor launched the International Speaker Fund by asking all former Presidents to donate $1000 each. The JSCE began publishing twice per year. The Society of Jewish Ethics created agreement with SCE for joint meetings. Student representation welcomed on the Board. Programming expanded to include Friday mornings.

        2004 Junior Faculty held their first announced meeting.

        2005 Ads by publishers were accepted in the program booklet.

        2006 The position of Associate Executive Director was established: Linda Schreiber. The Catholic liturgy was listed on program with over 100 in attendance, after years of gathering informally in members’ rooms.

        2007 The position of Treasurer was established: Brian Matz. The position of Book Review Editor of the Journal established: Lois Malcolm.

        2008 Junior Faculty met as a recognized caucus. The archives were moved from Syracuse University to Princeton Theological Seminary.

        2009 50th anniversary of the Society was celebrated at the annual meeting in Chicago with recognition of Charter members, and Presidents. The SCE archives were moved to the Princeton Theological Seminary library from Syracuse Library. The newly installed collection is named for Edward LeRoy Long Jr , former archivist and founding member of the SCE.

        Current Officers and Committees

        The Society is governed by its Board of (twelve) directors. Three members are elected each year at the annual business meeting, for four - year terms. Between the two Board meetings, which occur at the annual meeting in January, the Society is governed by the Executive Committee of the Board.

        The main function of the Society is its Annual Meeting, whose program is designed by the Program Committee. Intellectual leadership is provided by the President, whose one-year term ends with a scholarly address to the membership assembled at the Annual Meeting. A Vice President is elected each year, and rises to the Presidency in the following year .

        Day-by-day administration is handled by the Executive Director and the Associate Executive Director, operating from offices at Concordia College in Moorhead and St. Cloud, Minnesota.

        The Nominating Committee is appointed by the Vice President, while the Program Committee largely overlaps the Executive Committee. The Professional Conduct Committee, appointed by the President with rolling three-year terms, meets to address allegations of misconduct--none of which have occurred since the Committee was initiated in 2001. The International Speakers Fund raises and disburses funds designated to support major speakers from abroad.

        While all these committees function from year to year, with terms varying from one to three years, there are also adhoc committees, formed as needed for carrying out specific mandates. These include search committees, which are appointed by the President as needed, to identify and vet candidates for term positions within the Society, most notably that of Executive Director and the editor(s) of the Journal of the SCE at five-year intervals.

         

        Officers

        President:
        M. Cathleen Kaveny's picture
        (M. Cathleen Kaveny)
        University of Notre Dame
        Professor of Law and Theology
        Vice President:
        WilliamSchweiker's picture
        (WilliamSchweiker)
        University of Chicago Divinity School
        Professor of Theological Ethics
        Treasurer:

        BrianMatz's picture
        (BrianMatz)
        Carroll College
        Asst Professor
        Past President:
        AllenVerhey's picture
        (AllenVerhey)
        Duke University Divinity School
        Professor of Christian Ethics

        Executive Staff

        Executive Director:
        sfloydthomas's picture
        (sfloydthomas)
        Vanderbilt University
        Associate Professor of Ethics
        Associate Executive Director:
        Linda's picture
        (Linda)

        Board of Directors

        Class of 2015

        JenniferBeste's picture
        (JenniferBeste)
        mlharris's picture
        (mlharris)
        Texas Christian University
        Assistant Professor of Religion and Ethics
        gkao@cst.edu's picture
        (gkao@cst.edu)
        Claremont School of Theology
        Associate Professor of Ethics

        Class of 2016

        lmalcolm@luthersem.edu's picture
        (lmalcolm@luther...)
        Luther Seminary
        Associate Professor of Systematic Theology
        Cynthia Moe-Lobeda's picture
        (Cynthia Moe-Lobeda)
        Seattle University
        Assistant Professor
        EmilyReimer-Barry's picture
        (EmilyReimer-Barry)
        University of San Diego
        Assistant Professor of Theology and Rel Studies

        Class of 2017

        JenniferHarvey's picture
        (JenniferHarvey)
        Drake University
        Assistant Professor
        LauraStivers's picture
        (LauraStivers)
        Dominican University of California
        Chair, Masters of Humanities Program
        JonathanTran's picture
        (JonathanTran)
        Baylor University
        Asst Professor of Christian Ethics

        Class of 2018

        EricGregory's picture
        (EricGregory)
        Princeton University
        Assistant Professor
        KarenPeterson-Iyer's picture
        (KarenPeterson-Iyer)
        Santa Clara University
        Program Specialist in Health Care Ethics
        Todd Whitmore's picture
        (Todd Whitmore)
        University of Notre Dame
        Associate Professor

        Student Representatives

        lawachiu's picture
        (lawachiu)
        Fuller Theological Seminary
        Ph.D student
         
        Brett McCarty's picture
        (Brett McCarty)
        Duke University Divinity School
        Doctoral Student

        Editors

        mark.allman@merrimack.edu's picture
        (mark.allman@mer...)
        Merrimack College
        Associate Professor
         
        Tobias Winright's picture
        (Tobias Winright)
        Saint Louis University
        Mader Chair of Health Care Ethics, Associate Professor of Theological Studies

        Committees

        Executive Committee

        Consisting of the President, Vice President, past President, JSCE Editors, a Student Caucus representative, the Executive Director, and one President-appointed member of the Board, this committee meets typically in March to carry out Society business between the January board meetings.

        M. Cathleen Kaveny's picture
        (M. Cathleen Kaveny)
        University of Notre Dame
        Professor of Law and Theology

        WilliamSchweiker's picture
        (WilliamSchweiker)
        University of Chicago Divinity School
        Professor of Theological Ethics
        AllenVerhey's picture
        (AllenVerhey)
        Duke University Divinity School
        Professor of Christian Ethics
        mark.allman@merrimack.edu's picture
        (mark.allman@mer...)
        Merrimack College
        Associate Professor
        Tobias Winright's picture
        (Tobias Winright)
        Saint Louis University
        Mader Chair of Health Care Ethics, Associate Professor of Theological Studies
        sfloydthomas's picture
        (sfloydthomas)
        Vanderbilt University
        Associate Professor of Ethics
        JonathanTran's picture
        (JonathanTran)
        Baylor University
        Asst Professor of Christian Ethics

        Program Committee

        The Program Committee meets conjointly with the Executive Committee and has the same membership (Executive Director is ex officio), plus the other two Board members of the third class plus one SCE member appointed by the President. The Program Committee selects proposals and designs the program for the Annual Meeting, largely through a blind electronic ballot carried out before the Committee actually gathers in March or April. This selection process includes those serving on the Program Committee plus one vote from each of the Working Groups, the Women's Caucus, and the Students' Caucus.

        M. Cathleen Kaveny's picture
        (M. Cathleen Kaveny)
        University of Notre Dame
        Professor of Law and Theology
        WilliamSchweiker's picture
        (WilliamSchweiker)
        University of Chicago Divinity School
        Professor of Theological Ethics
        AllenVerhey's picture
        (AllenVerhey)
        Duke University Divinity School
        Professor of Christian Ethics
        mark.allman@merrimack.edu's picture
        (mark.allman@mer...)
        Merrimack College
        Associate Professor
        Tobias Winright's picture
        (Tobias Winright)
        Saint Louis University
        Mader Chair of Health Care Ethics, Associate Professor of Theological Studies
        RonaldHamel's picture
        (RonaldHamel)
        Catholic Health Association
        Senior Director of Ethics
        JenniferHarvey's picture
        (JenniferHarvey)
        Drake University
        Assistant Professor
        jbeste's picture
        (jbeste)
        College of St. Benedict, St. John's University-MN
        Associate Professor
        JonathanTran's picture
        (JonathanTran)
        Baylor University
        Asst Professor of Christian Ethics
           

        Search Committee

        The Search Committee, appointed by the President as needed, to identify and vet candidates for term positions within the Society, most notably that of Executive Director, the editor(s) of the Journal of the SCE at five-year intervals, and the position of Treasurer.

        Nominating Committee

        The Nominating Committee is chaired by a member of the Board of Directors and consist of four other members of the Society (not members of the Board of Directors) appointed annually by the Vice President from among those present at the Annual Meeting. This committee nominates two candidates for Vice President and six candidates for three Board positions, and oversees the balloting at the Saturday business meeting.

        Chair:

        gkao@cst.edu's picture
        (gkao@cst.edu)
        Claremont School of Theology
        Associate Professor of Ethics

         

        mhirschfeld's picture
        (mhirschfeld)
        Villanova University
        WillisJenkins's picture
        (WillisJenkins)
        University of Virginia
        Associate Professor of Religion, Ethics, and Environment
        TerrenceJohnson's picture
        (TerrenceJohnson)
        Haverford College
        Associate Professor of Religion
        JonathanRothchild's picture
        (JonathanRothchild)
        Loyola Marymount University
        Associate Professor

        Professional Conduct Committee

        Consisting of five or six senior and respected members of the Society, the Professional Conduct Committee is appointed by the President to terms of three years on a rolling basis. The PCC meets only as needed, during the Annual Meeting, to respond to allegations of misconduct according to an informal grievance procedure defined in the Standards of Professional Conduct adopted by the SCE in 2009.

         

        Term ends 2015

        StephenLammers's picture
        (StephenLammers)
        Lafayette College
        Professor Emeritus

        Term ends 2016

        Mary Jo Iozzio's picture
        (Mary Jo Iozzio)
        Boston College School of Theology and Ministry
        Associate Prof of Moral Theology

        Term ends 2017

        MarkDouglas's picture
        (MarkDouglas)
        Columbia Theological Seminary, Columbia University
        Associate Professor of Christian Ethics

        Term ends 2018

        SondraWheeler's picture
        (SondraWheeler)
        Wesley Theological Seminary
        Professor of Christian Ethics

        International Speakers Fund

        The Program Committee committee allocates and awards honoraria and travel expenses to invited international speakers, principally from the global south. Individuals or interest groups inviting the speaker is strongly encouraged to develop multiple speaking venues for those invited speakers with those venues sharing in the cost to and from the United States, in addition to any costs and stipends for activities at each venue. Prior to 2013, this was a separate committee. Please see https://scethics.org/global-initiatives/international-speakers-fund for more information.

        International Scholarly Relations Committee

        The International Scholarly Relations Committee (formerly the Global Research in Ethics Committee  created in 2010), consisting of Presidential appointees, has the general charge of developing ties with scholars and institutions throughout the developing and developed world.

        Chair:
        Jan Jans's picture
        (Jan Jans)
        Tilburg University
        Asst Professor of Moral Theology
         
        MargaretFarley's picture
        (MargaretFarley)
         
        JamesKeenan's picture
        (JamesKeenan)
        Boston College
        Professor
         
        WilliamSchweiker's picture
        (WilliamSchweiker)
        University of Chicago Divinity School
        Professor of Theological Ethics
         
        Mary Jo Iozzio's picture
        (Mary Jo Iozzio)
        Boston College School of Theology and Ministry
        Associate Prof of Moral Theology
         
        glenstassen's picture
        (glenstassen)
        Fuller Theological Seminary
        Professor of Christian Ethics

           

        2020 Future of Christian Ethics Committee

        The 2020 Committee will explore the current status of, and future prospects for, the field of "Christian ethics" as a field of scholarship and teaching in the academy.  It will do so with an eye to reporting the findings of its inquiries, and communicating what recommendations may be derived therefrom, to the whole Society of Christian Ethics, in order better to inform and guide the actions of the Society, now and in years to come.

        The Committee has two objectives.  First, it seeks to understand, using all possible evidence, the current state of the field of Christian ethics -- in terms of its pedagogical, intellectual, and institutional presence in the academy; in terms of its vocation (both pedagogically and institutionally) in churches and ecclesial bodies; and in terms of its vocation in public life, conceived broadly.  Second, it seeks to use that understanding to offer tentative practical recommendations regarding how best to commit the resources of the Society to the present encouragement, and future cultivation, of the field of Christian ethics in the academy, for the churches, and amidst the public.

        UPDATE: December, 2013

        The 2020 Committee on the Future of Christian Ethics has completed a report that is the product of several years' hard work on the part of the members of the committee. While the committee expects to revise this report one more time after this year's SCE meeting, it merits the Society's general attention now.  It will form the basis of the conversation during a session on Friday morning at the SCE annual conference in Seattle in January 2014.  I hope -- and the committee hopes -- that wide dissemination of the report will stimulate discussion, in that session and beyond. 

        This report is meant to be a conversation-starter, not a final statement of the Society's considered views.  The hard work of this committee provides the Society an opportunity for a renewal of our ongoing conversations about what Christian ethics is, what it ought to be, and how it could get from the former to the latter.  I hope -- and the committee hopes -- that many of you can attend the session in Seattle, and that the discussion this report is meant to provoke continues beyond the conference itself.

        Attached is the report and responses to it.

        Chair:
        CTMathewes's picture
        (CTMathewes)
        University of Virginia
        Associate Professor of Religious Studies
         
        GloriaAlbrecht's picture
        (GloriaAlbrecht)
        University of Detroit Mercy
        Professor of Religious Studies
         
        vcarmona's picture
        (vcarmona)
        Oblate School of Theology
         
        Miguel A. De La Torre's picture
        (Miguel A. De La...)
        Iliff School of Theology/University of Denver
        Associate-Professor of Christian Ethics

        Past President

         
        gary dorrien's picture
        (gary dorrien)
        Union Theological Seminary
        Reinhold Niebuhr Professor of Social Ethics
         
        David P. Gushee's picture
        (David P. Gushee)
        Mercer University
        Distinguished Univ Professor of Christian Ethics
         
        PerryHamalis's picture
        (PerryHamalis)
        North Central College
        Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
         
        StanleyHauerwas's picture
        (StanleyHauerwas)
        Duke University Divinity School
        Giblert T. Rowe Prof of Theological Ethics
         
        JenniferHerdt's picture
        (JenniferHerdt)
        Yale Divinity School
        Associate Professor of Theology
         
        ElizabethHinson-Hasty's picture
        (ElizabethHinson...)
        Bellarmine University
         
        WillisJenkins's picture
        (WillisJenkins)
        University of Virginia
        Associate Professor of Religion, Ethics, and Environment
         
        gkao@cst.edu's picture
        (gkao@cst.edu)
        Claremont School of Theology
        Associate Professor of Ethics
         
        PeterParis's picture
        (PeterParis)
        Princeton Theological Seminary
        Professor
         
        toddiepeters's picture
        (toddiepeters)
        Elon University
        Asst. Professor
         
        mss9vh's picture
        (mss9vh)
        University of Virginia
        PhD Student
         
        AngelaSims's picture
        (AngelaSims)
        Saint Paul School of Theology
         
        AllenVerhey's picture
        (AllenVerhey)
        Duke University Divinity School
        Professor of Christian Ethics

        President

        Lifetime Achievement Award Committee

        The Lifetime Achievement Award Committee, consisting of the outgoing three Board members and Past President, will submit to the Board their recommendation to determine the recipient in any given year for the Lifetime Achievement Award. Newly instituted in 2010, this Award recognizes up to one member per Annual Meeting for creative, influential and lasting contributions to the field of Christian ethics.

        The award will recognize outstanding, sustained, and substantive contributions of the recipient that have advanced the field of Christian ethics, taking into consideration the following factors: the quality and quantity of the recipient’s publications, scholarship that defines the issues Christian ethicists must address, influence within the field of Christian ethics as manifested in the work of the recipient’s students, and influence of the recipient’s scholarship in promoting the importance and relevance of Christian ethics for audiences beyond the discipline itself and beyond the academy.

        AllenVerhey's picture
        (AllenVerhey)
        Duke University Divinity School
        Professor of Christian Ethics
        GloriaAlbrecht's picture
        (GloriaAlbrecht)
        University of Detroit Mercy
        Professor of Religious Studies
        David P. Gushee's picture
        (David P. Gushee)
        Mercer University
        Distinguished Univ Professor of Christian Ethics
        lysaught's picture
        (lysaught)
        Loyola University Chicago
        Associate Professor

        Finance Committee

        The Finance Committee, consisting of the Vice President, Treasurer, Executive Director, Associate Executive Director and one President-appointed Board member, prepares the annual budget, makes budget forecasts, and oversees the finances of the Society.

        M. Cathleen Kaveny's picture
        (M. Cathleen Kaveny)
        University of Notre Dame
        Professor of Law and Theology
        BrianMatz's picture
        (BrianMatz)
        Carroll College
        Asst Professor
        sfloydthomas's picture
        (sfloydthomas)
        Vanderbilt University
        Associate Professor of Ethics
        JenniferBeste's picture
        (JenniferBeste)

        Website Committee

        Consisting of SCE members nominated and appointed by the Executive Director, the Website Committee oversees the design and functioning of the SCE website.

        Chair:
        PatrickFlanagan's picture
        (PatrickFlanagan)
        St. John's University
        Assistant Professor
        RobertVDoyle's picture
        (RobertVDoyle)
        Saint Louis University
        Joseph Wolyniak's picture
        (Joseph Wolyniak)
        University of Denver
        Visiting Scholar
        Linda's picture
        (Linda)


             

        21st Century Initiatives

        The Twenty-First Century Initiatives evolved from recommendations made in 1998-2000 by a committee whose stated purpose was to think about the current status and future directions of the Society as its members approached the beginning of a new millennium and the fortieth anniversary of the Society.  The committee was charged to address the evolving needs of our scholarly field by considering the following and related issues: the Society’s mission, likely changes in size and membership base, format of the annual meeting, governance structure, and access to new communication technologies to enhance the work of the Society.  Four subcommittees were formed, a survey instrument was designed that gave all members input, and recommendations emerged. The Initiatives chose to place its attention on the practices of the Society rather than on the name of the Society and to foster the particular practice of expanding our ethical conversations with ethicists in other cultures, traditions, and institutional settings.  The Initiatives have encouraged the formation of:

        • Three Working Groups, to enhance the visibility and contribution of emerging constituencies within Christian ethics: the African-American and African (since 2003), Latino/a (since 2007), and Asian and Asian-American (since 2008);
        • Two academic associations which now meet conjointly with the SCE: the Society of Jewish Ethics (since 2003) and the  Society for the Study of Muslim Ethics (beginning in 2010). 
        • The Global Scholars Program (since 2009). which coordinates and funds the visits by distinguished international scholars to annual meetings of the Society.

        Background Report

        History. The Committee for the Twenty-First Century was initiated by President Ronald M. Green as communicated in a letter to the members of the Society of Christian Ethics, dated October 16, 1998. The stated purpose of the committee was to think about the current status and future directions of the Society as its members approached the beginning of a new millennium and the fortieth anniversary of the Society. The committee was charged by President Green to address the evolving needs of our scholarly field by considering the following and related issues: the Society’s mission, likely changes in size and membership base, format of the annual meeting, governance structure, and access to new communication technologies to enhance the work of the Society. President Green invited all members of the Society to nominate Society members for service on this committee and to send nominations to him or to Dennis McCann, Executive Director. The Committee was asked to express its work in the form of recommendations.

        Membership. The members of the committee, approved by the Board of Directors at the 1999 Annual Meeting, are these: June O’Connor, Chair; Timothy Beach-Verhey, Frederick Bird, Audrey Chapman, Miguel De La Torre, Ronald M. Green, Christine Gudorf, Simeon Ilesanmi, Timothy Jackson, John Langan, Dennis McCann, Gene Outka, William Schweiker, Ruth Smith, Emilie Townes, Cristina Traina, Darryl Trimiew, Sumner Twiss, Louke Van Wensveen, Allen Verhey, and Sondra Wheeler.

        Committee Work. The Committee for the Twenty-First Century had its first meeting September 24-26, 1999 at the Illinois Conference Center in Zion, Illinois, using this time to raise questions and brainstorm possibilities. At June O’Connor’s request, Dennis McCann reported on the makeup of the Society, given the limited data base of information then available, and Ronald Green presented a report on the history of the Society. As a result of the brainstorming processes, four subcommittees emerged. One (Louke Van Wensveen, Chair, John Langan, Vice Chair) had as its task to think about the ways in which the SCE has been effective and productive in the course of its life and what it might do to sustain and improve its efficacy. A second (Emilie Townes, Chair, Frederick Bird, Vice Chair) focused on ways in which the SCE might extend and enhance its work by fostering formal and informal relationships with other individuals, societies, and agencies that do work in the fields of ethics. A third (Ruth Smith, Chair, Cristina Traina, Vice Chair) sought to articulate the questions that are evoking moral thought in our time. A fourth (Christine Gudorf, Chair) had as its task the design of a survey instrument that would poll the members and provide a data base of information useful to the committee and to the future. The survey was sent to Society members in November, 1999, and the results tabulated in March, 2000.

        The Committee for the Twenty-First Century met again at the Society’s Annual Meeting in Arlington, Virginia, January 7-9, 2000. A meeting of the committee was held Saturday night, January 8, 2000 at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City Hotel. A Closing Plenary Session on Sunday, January 9, provided a forum for informing the SCE members of the committee’s work to date and inviting participation in further brainstorming procedures relevant to the committee’s charge. Interim subcommittee reports were presented to those assembled, followed by “breakout” discussion sessions designed to encourage wide participation of Society members. Notes were taken, reports were submitted to the Chair, and suggestions were considered during committee deliberations that led to the final recommendations. A similar brainstorming session had been conducted with the Pacific Section of the SCE when that section had its annual meeting in Pasadena at Fuller Theological Seminary on February 19, 1999.

        The committee conducted its final meeting September 22-24, 2000 at the Harrington Conference Center of Columbia Theological Seminary in Decatur, Georgia. The chief agenda item was to formulate recommendations to be sent to the Board of Directors and Society members for attention at the annual meeting, 2001.

        Throughout its brainstorming processes and deliberations, the Committee addressed a wide variety of questions and concerns. One of these pertained to the name of the Society of Christian Ethics. Some members of the Society at large had expressed to individual committee members an interest in retaining the name as is, while others advised a change to the “Society of Christian and Comparative Ethics” and still others recommended the “Society of Religious Ethics.” It was also suggested that the Society of Christian Ethics foster the establishment of a sister society, The Society of Religious Ethics, that the annual meetings of these two societies overlap, and that ethicists doing work in the ethics of Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, Sikh, and other traditions be recruited for membership in the new sister society. In the end, the Committee for the Twenty-First Century chose to place its attention on the practices of the Society rather than on the name of the Society and to foster the particular practice of expanding our ethical conversations with ethicists in other cultures, traditions, and institutional settings. Our thinking in this regard is reflected in section five of the Report of Recommendations. Since the majority of our membership does research in “Christian ethics and in the relation of Christian ethics to other traditions of ethics and to social, economic, political, and cultural problems” (By-Laws, Article II), as is evident in the findings of the 1999-2000 poll, it was clear to our committee that as a Society we are, in fact, a community of scholars with a preeminent expertise and focus on Christian ethics and its relations to various problems and other traditions. If these interests and our members’ range of expertise should alter significantly over time, our identity would thereby change, and a name change would more appropriately be considered at that time.

        With the submission of this Background Report and the Report of Recommendations, the work of the Committee for the Twenty-First Century is completed.

        Reports submitted by June O’Connor, Chair
        on behalf of the Members of the Committee for the Twenty-First Century
        October 10, 2000

        Recommendations

        October 10, 2000

        The Committee for the Twenty-First Century begins its report by noting the ways in which the Society of Christian Ethics has effectively carried out its purposes as identified in Article II of the By-Laws. Article II states: "The purpose of the Society shall be to promote scholarly work in the field of Christian ethics and in the relation of Christian ethics to other traditions of ethics and to social, economic, political, and cultural problems; to encourage and improve the teaching of these fields in colleges, universities and theological schools; and to provide a community of discourse and debate for those engaged professionally with these general fields." As indicated by our review of the 1999-2000 membership poll, the Society has been particularly effective in providing a context for the professional development of its members and a stimulating environment through which members stay informed of new developments in the field, inform and assist one another in a collegial setting, and offer high quality papers in many areas.

        The Society has effectively investigated a variety of ethical issues, approaches, and resources, such as historical and methodological issues in ethics and the relationships between scripture and ethics, theology and ethics, feminism and ethics, and the like. In addition to valuing these lines of inquiry and analysis, the Committee for the Twenty-First Century and the membership’s stated interests in the 1999-2000 poll affirm the importance of attending to new patterns of and shifting perspectives on globalization. Among the many themes inviting fresh thought, the Committee encourages attention to identity shifts in the face of migration and the relocation of cultures and religions, freedom and justice in the face of inter- and intra-state conflict, on the one hand, and in light of the power of the media, free trade, and global advertising, on the other. Economic impacts on the workforce and workplace, on professional and personal interactions, and on issues of survival, sustainability, and flourishing call for attention. As ethicists, we wish always to be alert to new as well as familiar ways of moral thinking, imagining, and assessing, and of re-thinking and re-imagining the audiences with whom we explore ethical concerns. We recognize the importance of listening to unfamiliar voices and being attentive to the power relations embedded in moral discourse itself, both within our own communities and in relation to other communities.

        Given our involvements in a field of inquiry that constantly challenges us to enrich our work, and given the availability of new communication technologies, we make the following recommendations concerning 1) questions and concerns evoking moral thought in our time, 2) the Society's administration, 3) Society activities, 4) Society structures, and 5) ways in which we might expand our conversations to include ethicists in other traditions, cultures, and institutional settings.

        1. Recommendations Regarding Questions and Concerns

        1a. That the Society invite papers and other presentations on critical and self-critical thinking about issues of globalization.

        1b. That the Society foster scholarly analysis and invite presentations on the ethical implications of scientific and technological developments in our time.

        1c. Given the pluralistic setting of scholarly work in ethics, that the Society foster critical thinking and invite papers on the distinctiveness of Christian ethics and on religious moral identities in the new millennium.

        1d. That the Board of Directors establish a committee to develop guidelines expressing the Society’s relationship to various religious traditions and institutions, given the relationship between the churches and academic bodies (universities, colleges, and seminaries) regarding research and teaching of ethics; and that the committee consider ways in which the Society might assist members who are facing critical conflicts between the two.

        2. Recommendations Regarding Society Administration

        2a. That the Society through its Executive Director employ online technologies to enhance scholarly, pedagogical, and business communications. Useful contents would include the following:

        • a website with the SCE statement of purpose and membership information
        • email and listserv access
        • bulletin board discussion groups
        • a program of the most recent and forthcoming annual meetings that can be downloaded
        • a directory of members that can be searched but not downloaded
        • information on the Annual and how to subscribe
        • the most recent Presidential Address
        • dates and locations of related meetings
        • links to related websites

        It is hoped that these services will be available at the earliest possible date.

        2b. That the Board of Directors establish a structure to explore the implications of online technologies for professional development, knowledge about intellectual property rights, justice in the exchange of information and interpretation, and related issues.

        3. Recommendations Regarding Activities of the Society

        3a. That the Board of Directors institutionalize mechanisms for encouraging and recognizing the achievement of SCE members in connection with its activities: e.g., sponsoring an annual Student Essay Competition, and other kinds of awards. The Board of Directors should establish policies about such awards and the Executive Director should consult with the Board about additional necessary resources.

        3b. That the Board of Directors appoint a committee to investigate the feasibility and wisdom of fund-raising for initiatives recommended in this report and other society activities, and that this committee provide an initial report to the Board in January, 2002. This committee is urged to give special attention to seeking funding for recommendations 5a and 5c of this report.

        3c. That beginning in 2002, the schedule of the annual meeting be redesigned and lengthened by including Friday morning for concurrent sessions, interest groups, panels, seminars, contacts with local communities, and other activities; and that the use of the Sunday morning time slots be revised to make room for concurrent sessions or other meeting formats, including special opportunities, as meeting locations warrant. [The Committee for the Twenty-First Century voted 14 in favor, 5 against extending the meeting to include Friday morning; the vote in favor of using the Sunday closing plenary session for other purposes was unanimously supported by the Committee (19 in favor, 0 opposed).] We recommend that at least some interest group time slots be integrated into the overall programming throughout the day. We also recommend that the Friday plenary continue to be scheduled in the early afternoon time frame as has been customary. These changes are recommended as ways of accommodating our increasing numbers as a society and in light of our committee’s recommendations pertaining to new mechanisms for sharing knowledge.

        3d. That beginning in 2002 both conveners and respondents be assigned to sessions in which single papers are presented. The convener’s task would be to introduce the speakers, monitor time, and coordinate questions. The respondent’s task would be to provide brief (5-7 minute) remarks that raise constructive questions or provide resources to strengthen the argument of the paper. We advise the Program Committee to make special efforts to invite younger members or members not otherwise on the program to fulfill these functions.

        3e. That the Executive Director respond to requests by individuals or groups for worship or meditation opportunities at the annual meeting by making available appropriate spaces and time slots within the program schedule and by alerting members to these events.

        3f. That the Board of Directors establish a mentoring program in which members, especially new members, can be assigned to voluntary mentors in their fields who will provide ongoing scholarly and pedagogical support and cultivate connections within the field.

        3g. That the Society sponsor an annual “New Members” event for members of less than three years duration, to be attended by them, the Board of Directors, and mentors of new members.

        3h. That beginning with the annual meeting of 2002, the Program Committee invite narrative and artistic approaches to ethical issues and develop new ways of integrating these into the annual meeting.

        3i. That the Board of Directors appoint a committee to establish writers’ groups. The aim would be to encourage and mentor constructive new work among younger scholars (as modeled by the University of Chicago Writers’ Group).

        4. Recommendations Regarding Society Structures

        4a. That the Society stimulate the establishment of additional regional sections of the SCE, as has been accomplished by members in the Pacific Section.

        4b. That the Annual Meeting incorporate the workshop format as a new structure with the purpose of providing a forum for members to address pedagogical questions and skill-building in multiple sessions at a given meeting. This workshop format would require advance communication and pre-meeting reading of relevant materials.

        4c. That the editorial board of the Annual be assigned the task of reexamining the purposes of the Annual. Issues to be considered would include frequency of publication, eligibility of submitted articles, name of the publication, and related issues. Consultation with past and present editors and editorial board members is advised. A report to the Board is requested no later than the annual meeting, 2003.

        4d. That the Society consider creating a list of consultants, consisting of interested members with expertise in particular areas, embodying the diversity of viewpoints representative of Society members. This would be a service of the society to non-academic groups debating issues, such as the media, denominational and religious agencies, and governmental and non-governmental organizations.

        5. Recommendations Regarding the Expansion of Ethical Conversations within the Society

        5a. That the Society of Christian Ethics establish working groups with four year mandates whose charge is to cultivate conversations and working relationships with ethicists focusing on the following areas: Hispanic Christian ethics, African and African-American Christian ethics, Jewish and Christian ethics, and Islamic and Christian ethics. These mandates might take the form of program sessions, committee membership, recommendations regarding meeting locations, recruitment efforts, and the like. The Board is urged to act on this recommendation as soon as possible and to establish at least one of these working groups by 2002. Interest groups might apply to be working groups in order to assume these responsibilities.

        5b. Beyond recommendation 5a, in the future, other working groups might be designated to assume responsibilities for expanding conversations with other constituencies.

        5c. That the Society forge formal as well as informal relationships with societies, associations, and individuals in other parts of the world (e.g., Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America) who have similar interests in religions and ethics; that joint meetings be fostered and arranged; and that delegations of individuals who need economic assistance in order to participate in scholarly meetings be sponsored financially.

        5d. That the Society encourage and foster conversations with ethicists working for religious bodies, research agencies, and governmental and non-governmental organizations and that ethicists in these settings be encouraged to become members of the SCE.

        An appendix to this report of recommendations identifies areas of responsibility regarding the implementation of these recommendations by the SCE Board of Directors, the Executive Director, the Program Committee, and Society Members.

        Global Research in Ethics (formerly Global Scholars Program)

        The SCE invites proposals to bring scholars from the Global South to the SCE annual meeting, with travel, accommodations and food at the SCE meetings paid for by the SCE’s International Speakers Fund (ISF). The Global Scholars Program includes a presentation at the SCE meetings as well as on-campus lectures by the visiting scholar immediately after the SCE meetings.

        Participating campuses will schedule a public lecture by the visiting scholar and in turn face these expectations: cover the cost of airfare from the SCE conference site (or from the previous campus), cover all the ordinary costs of a lecture on campus (including an honorarium for the speaker typical for that campus), and a contribute to the ISF to help defray the costs of international travel (which helps replenish the ISF so this process can continue). The size of contribution requested is $500-1000.

        Here is the sequence of events describing a successful application for the 2016 meeting:

        1. By the deadline for SCE paper proposals (March 2014), you submit a proposal to bring a visiting scholar to the SCE annual meetings nearly two years later.
        2. At the March 2014 Program Committee meeting, the most promising such proposal is approved, conditionally reserving a slot on the program for the 2016 annual meeting, and conditionally approving financing for travel, accommodations, and meals. The condition is that you, the organizer, will arrange for a few (ideally 3 or 4) on-campus lectures for the visiting scholar at various campuses in the US or Canada before and/or after the 2014 SCE meeting.
        3. Upon receiving conditional approval, you work in Fall 2014 (more than a year ahead of time) to arrange on-campus lectures for the visiting scholar. You are encouraged to advertise this possibility by email circulated by the SCE to the membership. You finish this work in January 2014, one year ahead of time, and send your plans to the International Speakers Fund Committee for approval.
        4. In February 2015 (ten months before the 2016 Annual Meeting) the International Speakers Fund Committee receives your plans and, presuming you have made the required arrangements, informs the Program Committee that funding is now guaranteed.
        5. In March 2015 (nine months before the 2016 Annual Meeting) the Program Committee assigns an appropriate time slot for the visiting scholar to make his or her presentation.
        6. During the spring or summer, you finalize all plans, oversee the purchase of plane tickets for all stops in the visiting scholar’s itinerary, and attend to any other details.
        7. You act as coordinator of arrangements during the scholar’s time in the US.

        Preference for funding from the International Speakers Fund goes to scholars from underrepresented groups and from institutions where limited resources restrict international travel.

        Membership Application

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        SCE Mail-In Membership Application39.5 KB

        The Society of Christian Ethics welcomes new members annually. There are two categories of membership: full and student.

        Full membership in the Society is open to persons in the following groups: (1) college, university, or seminary teachers of Christian ethics or social ethics; (2) persons teaching in similar institutions in other fields who are concerned with the relation of Christian ethics to their subject matter; (3) persons whose full-time professional work in church, government, social agency or elsewhere is related to the purposes of the Society. Candidates for membership must have at least one of the following: a Ph.D. or equivalent degree or scholarly publications in the above-named fields, or a full-time teaching position in ethics or related fields in an accredited institution of higher learning.

        Student membership is open to graduate students in ethics or related fields upon matriculation into a doctoral program. This status ordinarily may be retained for not more than ten years.

        Detailed membership eligibility information is available in Article III of the SCE By-laws. If you meet these criteria, we invite you to complete the application below. Benefits of membership include reduced registration rate at the annual meeting, eligibility to submit proposals for the annual meeting and therefore to be published in the Journal of the Society, and most importantly, a broad network of fellow scholars and others in the field of ethics.

        If you are eligible for membership and have created an account here on the site, you may apply online using the Online Membership Form. If needed, you may download the form (doc format) attached below and mail/email it to the SCE.

        All applications are formally approved by the Board at the annual meeting so applications need to be received by December 31st.